GENERAL ADMISSIONS POLICY


The following admissions criteria apply to basic admission to the Careers Institute of America.  Please note, additional admissions requirements may apply to specific programs.

This Admissions Policy is used to define the enrollment requirements for individuals who wish to enroll at Career Institute of America as a regular student.  Career Institute of America, must adhere to the U.S. Department of Education, TX Department of Licensing and Regulation, Texas Workforce Commission and COE guidelines.

Specific Admissions Requirements for Each Program

 

Career Institute of America is an equal opportunity employer and follows the same policies in accepting applications from potential students.  Career Institute of America is open to all students without regard to race, color, religion, age, sex, creed, origin, sexual orientation, disability or marital status. The admission policy is in compliance with the U.S. Department of Education, TX Department of Licensing and Regulation, Texas Workforce Commission and COE guidelines and the Veterans Administration Education Department. 

To be eligible for admission, an applicant must be able to read and write English, and the student must meet the following requirements:

 

  • Interview with an Admissions Representative.
  • Applicant must be at least 17 years of age (applicants under the age of 18 require written permission from a parent or legal guardian in order to enroll)
  • Present proof of appropriate secondary education such as:
    • High School Diploma, GED Certificate or other state-sanctioned test or diploma-equivalency certificate. Some examples of secondary level education are:
      • Homeschooled – has completed homeschooling at the secondary level as defined by state law; has completed secondary school education in a homeschool setting which qualifies for an exemption from compulsory attendance requirements under state law, if state law does not require a homeschooled student to receive a credential for their education.

Though homeschooled students are not considered to have a high school diploma or equivalent, they are eligible to receive FSA funds if their secondary school education was in a homeschool that state law treats as a home or private school. Some states issue a secondary school completion credential to homeschoolers. If this is the case in the state where the student was homeschooled, s/he must obtain this credential to be eligible for FSA funds if the state requires it. S/he can include in their homeschooling self-certification that s/he received this state credential. An eligible institution is defined in part as one that admits as regular students only those who have a high school diploma or equivalent, are beyond the compulsory age of attendance for the school’s state, or are dually enrolled at the college and a secondary school.

  • Foreign High School diploma or transcript – High school diplomas/transcripts from other countries are acceptable toward the student eligibility general requirement as long as the diploma is equivalent to a U.S. high school diploma. 

Documentation of proof of completion of secondary education from a foreign country must be officially translated into English and officially certified as the equivalent of high school completion in the United States.

 

  • Has completed one of the ability-to-benefit (ATB) alternatives and was first enrolled in an eligible postsecondary program prior to July 1, 2012.

 

  • ATB/Career Pathway 

 

At this time Career Institute of America does not admit student using ATB for any of its Title IV, HEA programs.  However, a student may use the ATB to enroll in the 108 clock hour program.  Those students can enroll by passing the Wonderlic Basic Test.  Students must achieve a passing score of 200 on the Verbal and 210 for Quantitative, on the Wonderlic test.  ALL STUDENTS ADMITTED PROGRAMS VIA the ABILITY-TO-BENEFIT MUST ENROLL IN THE CIA’S GED PREP PROGRAM; AND, MUST ATTEMPT THE GED TEST PRIOR TO COMPLETING THEIR PROGRAM

 

  • Tour the Institute facility.
  • Meet with a Program Director or Director of the school.
  • Sign a Student Disclosure Form.
  • Sign an Enrollment Agreement.

 

  • To receive FSA funds, a student must be qualified to study at the postsecondary level. A student qualifies if he or she:
  1. Has a high school diploma (this can be from a foreign school if it is equivalent to a U.S. high school diploma);
  2. Has the recognized equivalent of a high school diploma, such as a general educational development or GED certificate or other state- sanctioned test or diploma-equivalency certificate;
  3. Has completed homeschooling at the secondary level as defined by state law; or
  4. Has completed secondary school education in a homeschool setting which qualifies for an exemption from compulsory attendance requirements under state law, if state law does not require a home- schooled student to receive a credential for their education.
  5. Has completed one of the ability-to-benefit (ATB) alternatives and was first enrolled in an eligible postsecondary program prior to July 1, 2012.
  6. The applicant must provide this documentation during the enrollment process. The applicant will not be accepted until all documents are provided and are on file.
  • Career Institute of America does not have a Career Pathways Program.
  • Finalize financial arrangements prior to class start.

 

Diploma mill definition – An entity that: 

 

  1. Charges someone a fee and requires him to complete little or no education or coursework to obtain a degree, diploma, or certificate that may be used to represent to the general public that he has completed a program of secondary or postsecondary education or training; and 

 

  1. Lacks accreditation by an agency or association that is recognized as an accrediting body for institutions of higher education by the Secretary (pursuant to Part H, Subpart 2 of Title IV) or a federal agency, state government, or other organization that recognizes accrediting agencies or associations.

 

Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990

 

The school complies with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and is wheelchair accessible. If enrolled under training with a government agency, institution district, and/or other entity, students must meet the admission requirements set out in the training agreement and/or applicable state licensing or certifications requirements. 

 

Policy Granting Credit (only applies to 180-hour courses)

Career Institute of America will collect information provided by a prospective student to provide a record by which previous education and training may be evaluated and credit given to the student and to provide a record of such credit and reduction of program length/cost as required by the law.

 

Policy on Transferring/Earning Credits

Coursework and/or credit from this school may not be transferrable to other institutions of education and acceptance is at the discretion of the receiving institution. HSOC does not accept the transfer of credits from other institutions, and transferable credits will not be earned by completing HSOC programs. 

 

Policy on Transferring Between Programs within the Institution

Programs offered at Career Institute of America are self-contained. Students do not transfer from other institutions, nor do they transfer between programs within Career Institute of America.

 

Non-Title IV, HEA Eligible programs:

The following courses are not eligible for Title IV or HEA.  If you have any questions, please contact Admissions directly at (972) 239-3630.

 

108-hour HVAC Technician course (daytime and evening classes)

120-hour Welding Basic Technician course (daytime and evening classes)

All seminars programs are also not eligible (daytime and evening classes)

 

Veterans Benefits/Other Funding Sources 

 

All programs of study at Career Institute of America are approved by the Texas Veterans Commission for enrollment of those eligible to receive benefits under Section 3676, Chapters 30 or 32, Title 38. The determination for TVC funds are made directly through the Texas Veteran’s Commission. Additional funding may be obtained for eligible candidates through many different programs including; Texas Workforce Commission, Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services (DARS), and Private Scholarship funds. The determinations for these funds are made through the respective organizations. 

 

Incarcerated Applicants

A student is considered to be incarcerated if she/he is serving a criminal sentence in a federal, state, or local penitentiary, prison, jail, reformatory, work farm, or similar correctional institution (whether it is operated by the government or a contractor). A student is not considered to be incarcerated if she/he is in a halfway house or home detention or is sentenced to serve only weekends. Our attendance policy specifies that all classes and practical studies are done at the school’s physical location; therefore, incarcerated students are not eligible for admissions.

 

Conviction for possession or sale of illegal drugs 

 

  • A Federal or state drug conviction can disqualify a student for FSA funds. The student self-certifies in applying for aid that he/she is eligible for by using the FAFSA.  Career Institute of America is not required to confirm this unless there is evidence of conflicting information.
  • The chart below illustrates the period of ineligibility for FSA funds, depending on whether the conviction was for sale or possession and whether the student had previous offenses. (A conviction for the sale of drugs includes conviction for conspiring to sell drugs)

 

Possession of illegal drugs Sale of illegal drug
1st Offense 1 year from date of conviction 2 year from date of conviction
2nd Offense 2 year from date of conviction Indefinite period
3+ Offense Indefinite period

 

  • If a student was convicted of both possessing and selling illegal drugs, and the periods of ineligibility are different the student will be ineligible for the longer period.
  • A student regains eligibility the day after the period of ineligibility ends or when he/she successfully completes a qualified drug rehabilitation program. Further drug conviction will make him/her ineligible again.
  • When a student regains eligibility during the award year, the institute may award Pell and/or Loan for the current payment period.
  • A qualified drug rehabilitation program must include at least two unannounced drug tests and must satisfy at least one of the following requirements:
    • Be qualified to receive funds directly or indirectly from a federal, state or local government program.
    • Be qualified to receive payment directly or indirectly from a federally or state-licensed insurance company.
    • Be administered or recognized by federal, state or local government agency or court.
    • Be administered or recognized by a federally or state-licensed hospital, health clinic or medical doctor.

Upon receipt of all required documents and in good order, the prospective student is eligible to enroll in the school. When all admissions criteria and requirements are met, the prospective student is given the date of the next class. The first day of class will include financial aid and academic orientation, in which the students will sign their enrollment contract, student permit form and additional required paperwork.

 

FAFSA Verification 

 

Every year a number of students who are eligible for financial aid are randomly selected for verification by the U.S. Department of Education by the FAFSA Central Processing System (CPS). If a student is selected for federal verification, they will be asked to complete a Verification Worksheet (provided by the Office of Student Financial Planning) and must provide additional information before financial aid can be disbursed to the student account. This documentation may include but is not limited to federal income tax transcript and W-2 forms (student’s, spouse and/or parents/guardians), proof of untaxed income, housing allowances, etc. Students will be notified in writing of all documents required to fulfill this federal requirement and what their verification code (V1 – V6) was so they can complete the required verification requirement. If after review by the Office of Student Financial Planning, there are any changes to the financial aid package the student will be notified in writing.

 

Facilities/ Services for Student with Disabilities

 

The school complies with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and is wheelchair accessible. The school will provide reasonable modifications and/or accommodations for students with disabilities depending on the student’s need. 

 

If you are interested in attending Career Institute of America but are in need of accommodations, you should schedule an appointment with the Director.  At this meeting, we will discuss the nature of the reported disability and its impact on learning. We will also discuss the process of receiving reasonable accommodations at Career Institute of America and the types of accommodations available.

 

Please bring copies of current documentation of a disability to this meeting. 

Documentation must be provided by a medical expert within the last three years and include:

  • a diagnosis of the disability; 
  • how the diagnosis was determined (what tests were given and the results); and 
  • A clinical summary, which includes an assessment of how the disability will impact the individual in a college environment and what accommodations are recommended.

 

Upon completion of the initial meeting, a formal request for the accommodation must be submitted in writing to the school. The school will respond to the request within 15 days of receipt. During this 15-day time frame, the school will consult with Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation in order to ensure the accommodation will be granted during the state board-licensing exam. The initial meeting, formal request, and response from the school must take place prior to the pre-enrollment process.

Note: In order to be eligible for Title IV, HEA funding, you must be able to benefit from the reasonable accommodations and be able to take the state board-licensing exam. 

 

CONTACT INFORMATION FOR ASSISTANCE IN OBTAINING 

INSTITUTIONAL OR FINANCIAL AID INFORMATION 

 

Disclosure Requirement: Made available through appropriate publications, mailings, or electronic media

 

HEA Sec 485(a) (1)-(2), 20 U.S.C. 1092 (a) (1)-(2). Not changed by HEOA 34 C.F.R. 668.41 (a) – (d); 668.43 revised August 21, 2009 NPRM (revised 34 CFR 668, 43 added 34 CFR 668.231)

 

Each institution must make available to prospective and enrolled students information regarding how and where to contact individuals designated to assist enrolled or prospective students in obtaining the institutional or financial aid information required to be disclosed under HEA Sec. 485(a). This information is posted on Career Institute of America’s website and can be found in the student catalog. Paper copies are available upon request. 

 

Institutional Contact Information

Name: Rita Dutta

Office hours: 9:00 AM to 5:30PM

Phone number: 972-239-3630

Email: rita@careers-ins.org

 

INSTITUTIONAL REFUND POLICY


The institution shall have a fair and equitable refund policy for the refund of tuition, fees, and other intuitional charges in the event the institution cancels a class if a student does not enter or does not complete the period of enrollment for which the student has been charged. 

All of the following are elements of a fair and equitable plan:
a. The intuition’s refund policy must be published in the catalog and be uniformly administered.
b. Refunds, when due, must be made without requiring a request from the student
c. Refunds, when due, shall be made within 45 days (1) of the last day of attendance if written notification of withdrawal has been provided to the intuition by the student, or (2) from the date the intuition terminates the student or determines withdrawal by the
student.
d. Retention of tuition and fees collected in advance for a student who does not commence class shall not exceed $100.
e. The intuition must comply with the refund policies adopted by the Commission unless a deferent policy is mandated by a non-public intuition’s licensing agency or a public intuition’s governing board.

 

As referenced in item “e” above, the refund policy adopted by the Commission is as stated below:
1. Refunds for Classes Canceled by the Intuition
If tuition and fees are collected in advance of the start date of a program and the intuition cancels the class, 100% of the tuition and fees collected must be refunded. The refund shall be made within 45 days of the planned start date.
2. Refunds for Students Who Withdraw On or Before the First Day of Class
If tuition and fees are collected in advance of the start date of classes and the student does not begin classes or withdraws on the first day of classes, no more than $100 of the tuition and fees may be retained by the intuition. Appropriate refunds for a student
who does not begin classes shall be made within 45 days of the class start date.
3. Refunds for Students Enrolled Prior to Visiting the Institution
Students who have not visited the school facility prior to enrollment will have the opportunity to withdraw without penalty within three days following either attendance at a regularly scheduled orientation or following a tour of the facilities and inspection of the equipment.


(b) Non-Public institution
(1) Refund Policy for Programs Obligating Students for Periods of 12 Months or Less
The refund policy for students a ending non-public institution who incur a financial obligation for a period of 12 months or less
shall be as follows:
(i) During the first 10% of the period of financial obligation, the institution shall refund at least 90% of the tuition; (ii) After the first 10% of the period of financial obligation and until the end of the first 25% of the period of obligation, the institution shall
refund at least 50% of the tuition; (iii) After the first 25% of the period of financial obligation and until the end of the first 50% of
the period of obligation, the institution on shall refund at least 25% of the tuition; and, (iv) After the first 50% of the period of financial obligation, the institution may retain all of the tuition.

Cancellation Policy
A full refund will be made to any student who cancels the enrollment contract within 72 hours (until midnight of the third day excluding Saturdays, Sundays and legal holidays) after the enrollment contract is signed or within the student’s first three scheduled class days, except that the school may retain not more than $100 in any administrative fees charged, as well as items of extra expense that are necessary for the portion of the program attended and stated separately on the enrollment agreement (does not apply to Seminars).

Refund Policy
1. Refund computations will be based on scheduled course time of class attendance through the last date of attendance. Leaves of absence, suspensions, and school holidays will not be counted as part of the scheduled class attendance.
2. The effective date of termination for refund purposes will be the earliest of the following:
(a) The last day of attendance, if the student is terminated by the school;
(b) The date of receipt of written notice from the student; or
(c) Ten school days following the last date of attendance.
3. If tuition and fees are collected in advance of entrance, and if after expiration of the 72 hour cancellation privilege the student does not enter school, not more than $100 in
nonrefundable administrative fees shall be retained by the school for the entire residence program or synchronous distance education course.
4. If a student enters a residence or synchronous distance education program and withdraws or is otherwise terminated, the school or college may retain not more than $100 in nonrefundable administrative fees for the entire program. The minimum refund of the remaining tuition and fees will be the pro rata portion of tuition, fees, and other charges that the number of hours remaining in the portion of the course or program for which the student has been charged after the effective date of termination bears to the total number of hours in the portion of the course or program for which the student has been charged, except that a student may not collect a refund if the student has completed 75 percent or more of the total number of hours in the portion of the
program for which the student has been charged on the effective date of termination.
5. Refunds for items of extra expense to the student, such as books, tools, or other supplies should be handled separately from refund of tuition and other academic fees. The student will not be required to purchase instructional supplies, books and tools until such time as these materials are required. Once these materials are purchased, no refund will be made.
6. A student who withdraws for a reason unrelated to the student’s academic status after the 75 percent completion mark and requests a grade at the time of withdrawal shall be given a grade of “incomplete” and permitted to re-enroll in the course or program during the 12-month period following the date the student withdrew without payment of additional tuition for that portion of the course or program.
7. A full refund of all tuition and fees is due and refundable in each of the following cases:
(a) An enrollee is not accepted by the school;
(b) If the course of instruction is discontinued by the school and this prevents the student
from completing the course; or

(c) If the student’s enrollment was procured as a result of any misrepresentation in
advertising, promotional materials of the school, or representations by the owner or
representatives of the school.

Refund Policy for Student called to Military Service
A student of the school or college who withdraws from the school or college as a result of the student being called to active duty in a military service of the United States or the Texas National Guard may elect one of the following options for each program in which the student is enrolled:
(a) If tuition and fees are collected in advance of the withdrawal, a pro rata refund of any
tuition, fees, or other charges paid by the student for the program and a cancellation of any unpaid tuition, fees, or other charges owed by the student for the portion of the program the student does not complete following withdrawal;
(b) A grade of incomplete with the designation “withdrawn-military” for the courses in the
program, other than courses for which the student has previously received a grade on the student’s transcript, and the right to re-enroll in the program, or a substantially equivalent program if that program is no longer available, not later than the first anniversary of the date the student is discharged from active military duty without payment of additional tuition, fees, or
other charges for the program other than any previously unpaid balance of the original tuition, fees, and charges for books for the program; or
(c) The assignment of an appropriate final grade or credit for the courses in the program, but only if the instructor or instructors of the program determine that the student has:
(1) Satisfactorily completed at least 90 percent of the required coursework for the program;
and
(2) Demonstrated sufficient mastery of the program material to receive credit for completing
the program.
(3) Refunds will be totally consummated within 40 days after the effective date of
termination.

Refund Policy for Seminars
1. Refund computations will be based on the period of enrollment computed on basis of
course time (clock hours).
2. The effective date of termination for refund purposes will be the earliest of the following:
(a) The last date of attendance; or
(b) The date of receipt of written notice from the student.
3. If tuition and fees are collected in advance of entrance, and the student does not enter
school, not more than $100 shall be retained by the school.
4. If the student fails to enter the seminar, withdraws, or is discontinued at any time before
completion of the seminar, the student will be refunded the pro rata portion of tuition, fees, and
other charges that the number of class hours remaining in the seminar after the effective date of
termination bares to the total number of class hours in the seminar.
5. A full refund of all tuition and fees is due in each of the following cases:
(a) An enrollee is not accepted by the school;

(b) If the seminar of instruction is discontinued by the school and thus prevents the student from
completing the seminar; or
(c) if the student’s enrollment was procured as a result of any misrepresentation in advertising,
promotional materials of the school, or misrepresentations by the owner or representatives of the
school.
6. REFUND POLICY FOR STUDENTS CALLED TO ACTIVE MILITARY SERVICE.
A student of the school or college who withdraws from the school or college as a result of the
student being called to active duty in a military service of the United States or the Texas National
Guard may elect one of the following options for each program in which the student is enrolled:
(a) if tuition and fees are collected in advance of the withdrawal, a pro rata refund of any tuition,
fees, or other charges paid by the student for the program and a cancellation of any unpaid
tuition, fees, or other charges owed by the student for the portion of the program the student does
not complete following withdrawal;
(b) a grade of incomplete with the designation & withdrawn; for the courses in the
program, other than courses for which the student has previously received a grade on the
student’s transcript, and the right to re-enroll in the program, or a substantially equivalent
program if that program is no longer available, not later than the first anniversary of the date the
student is discharged from active military duty without payment of additional tuition, fees, or
other charges for the program other than any previously unpaid balance of the original tuition,
fees, and charges for books for the program; or
(c) The assignment of an appropriate final grade or credit for the courses in the program, but only
if the instructor or instructors of the program determine that the student has:
(1) Satisfactorily completed at least 90 percent of the required coursework for the program; and
(2) Demonstrated sufficient mastery of the program material to receive credit for completing the
program.
7. Refunds will be totally consummated within 40 days after the effective date of
termination

 

RETURN OF TITLE IV, HEA Policy

When a student applies for financial aid, a statement is signed that the funds will be used for educational purposes only. Therefore, if a student withdraws before completing the program, a portion of the funds received may have to be returned.   The School will calculate the amount of tuition to be returned to the Title IV, HEA Federal fund programs according to the policies listed below. 

 

RETURN TO TITLE IV FUNDS POLICY

This policy applies to students’ who withdraw officially, unofficially or fail to return from a leave of absence or are dismissed from enrollment at the School. It is separate and distinct from the School   refund policy. (Refer to institutional refund policy)

The calculated amount of the Return of Title IV, HEA (R2T4) funds that are required to be returned for the students affected by this policy, are determined according to the following definitions and procedures as prescribed by regulations.

The amount of Title IV, HEA aid earned is based on the amount of time a student spent in academic attendance, and the total aid received; it has no relationship to student’s incurred institutional charges. Because these requirements deal only with Title IV, HEA funds, the order of return of unearned funds do not include funds from sources other than the Title IV, HEA programs. 

Title IV, HEA funds are awarded to the student under the assumption that he/she will attend school for the entire period for which the aid is awarded. When student withdraws, he/she may no longer be eligible for the full amount of Title IV, HEA funds that were originally scheduled to be received. Therefore, the amount of Federal funds earned must be determined. If the amount disbursed is greater than the amount earned, unearned funds must be returned. 

The Payment Period for Clock Hour Schools is one-half of the academic year or program length (whichever is less).  

The Date of Determination is the date that the institution determines the student has withdrawn from the program.  For schools that are required to take attendance, the date of determination is no longer than 14 days after the Last Date of Attendance. For a student who withdraws while on a Leave of Absence the expected return date will be the date of determination for R2T4 purposes.   The Date of Determination starts the clock for timely refunds of Title IV funds, within 45 days after the “Date of Determination”.  

The Withdrawal Date for schools required to take attendance is the Last Date of Attendance (LDA).

The institution has 45 days from the date that the institution determines that the student withdrew to return all unearned funds for which it is responsible. The school is required to notify the student if they owe a repayment via written notice. 

The school must advise the student or parent that they have 14 calendar days from the date that the school sent the notification to accept a post withdraw disbursement. If a response is not received from the student or parent within the allowed time frame or the student declines the funds, the school will return any earned funds that the school is holding to the Title IV, HEA programs. 

Post-withdraw disbursements will occur within 90 days of the date that the student withdrew.

WITHDRAWAL POLICY

“Official” Voluntary Withdrawal 

A student is considered to be “Officially” withdrawn on the date the student notifies the Financial Aid Director or School Director in writing of their intent to withdraw. The date of the determination for return and refund purposes will be the earliest of the following for official withdrawals:

  1. Date student provided official notification of intent to withdraw, in writing.

    or 

  1. The date the student began the withdrawal from the School’s records. 

A student will be permitted to rescind his notification in writing and continue the program, if so chosen.  However, if the student subsequently drops, the student’s withdrawal date is the original date of notification of intent to withdraw. 

Upon receipt of the withdrawal information the School will complete the following

 

  1. Determine the student’s last date of attendance as of the last recorded date of academic attendance on the school’s attendance record, and

 

  1. Perform two calculations

 

  1. The students ledger card and attendance record are reviewed to determine the calculation of Return of Title IV, HEA funds the student has earned, and if any, the amount of Title IV, HEA funds for which the school is responsible.  Returns made to the Federal Funds Account are calculated using the Department’s Return of Title IV, HEA Funds Worksheets, scheduled attendance and are based upon the payment period. 

 

  1. Calculate the school’s refund requirement (see school refund calculation).

 

  1. The student’s grade record will be updated to reflect his/her final grade.

 

  1. The School will return the amount for any unearned portion of the Title IV, HEA funds for which the school is responsible within 45 days of the date the official notice was provided.

 

  1. If applicable, the School will provide the student with a letter explaining the Title IV, HEA requirements. To include,

 

  1. The amount of Title IV, HEA assistance the student has earned. This amount is based upon the length of time the student was enrolled in the program based on scheduled attendance and the amount of funds the student received. 

 

  1. Any returns that will be made to the Federal program on the student’s behalf as a result of exiting the program.  If a student’s scheduled attendance is more than 60% of the payment period, he/she is considered to have earned 100% of the Federal funds received for the payment period. In this case, no funds need to be returned to the Federal funds. 

 

  1. Advise the student of the amount of unearned Federal funds and tuition and fees that the student must return, if applicable.

 

  1. Supply the student with ledger card record noting outstanding balance due to the school and the available methods of payment. A copy of the completed worksheet, check, letter and final ledger card will be kept in the student’s file.

 

In the event a student decides to rescind his or her official notification to withdraw, the student must provide a signed and dated written statement indicating he/she is continuing his or her program of study, and intends to complete the payment period.  Title IV, HEA assistance will continue as originally planned. If the student subsequently fails to attend or ceases attendance without completing the payment period, the student’s withdrawal date is the original date of notification of intent to withdraw. 

Unofficial Withdrawal

Any student that does not provide official notification of his or her intent to withdraw and is absent for more than 14 consecutive calendar days, fails to maintain satisfactory academic progress, fails to comply with the school’s attendance and /or conduct policy, does not meet financial obligations to the school, or violates conditions mentioned in the School contractual agreement, will be subject to termination and considered to have unofficially withdrawn. 

Within two weeks of the student’s last date of academic attendance, the following procedures will take place.

 

  1. The education office will make three attempts to notify the student regarding his/her enrollment status. 
  2. Determine and record the student’s last date of attendance as the last recorded date of academic attendance on the attendance record. 
  3. The student’s withdrawal date is determined as the date the day after 14 consecutive calendar days of absence.
  4. Notify the student in writing of their failure to contact the school and attendance status resulting in the current termination of enrollment. 
  5. The School calculates the amount of Federal funds the student has earned, and, if any, the amount of Federal funds for which the school is responsible.  
  6. Calculate the school’s refund requirement (see school refund calculation).
  7. The School’s Controller will return to the Federal fund programs any unearned portion of Title IV funds for which the school is responsible within 45 days of the date the withdrawal determination was made, and record on student’s ledger card. 
  8. If applicable, the School will provide the student with a refund letter explaining Title IV requirements:

 

  1. The amount of Title IV aid the student has earned based upon the length of time the student was enrolled and scheduled to attend in the program and the amount of aid the student received. 

 

  1. Advise the student in writing of the amount of unearned Title IV, HEA aid and tuition and fees that he/she must return, if applicable.

 

  1. Supply the student with final student ledger card showing outstanding balance due the school and available methods of repayment. 
  2. A copy of the completed worksheet, check, letter, and final ledger card will be kept in the student’s file.

 

Withdraw Before 60%

The institution must perform a R2T4 to determine the amount of earned aid through the 60% point in each payment period. The institution will use the Department of Educations prorate schedule to determine the amount of the R2T4 funds the student has earned at the time of withdrawal. 

Withdraw After 60%

After the 60% point in the payment period, a student has earned 100% of the Title IV, HEA funds he or she was scheduled to receive during this period. The institution must still perform a R2T4 to determine the amount of aid that the student has earned.

The School measures progress in clock hours, and uses the payment period for the period of calculation.

The Calculation Formula:

 

Determine the amount of Title IV, HEA aid that was disbursed plus Title IV, HEA aid that could have been disbursed.  

Calculate the percentage of Title IV, HEA aid earned:

  1. Divide the number of clock hours scheduled to be completed (from the first day of class until the last date of attendance) in the payment period as of the last date of attendance in the payment period by the total clock hours in the payment period.

 

             HOURS SCHEDULED TO COMPLETE

             TOTAL HOURS IN PERIOD = % EARNED (rounded to one

             significant digit to the right of the decimal point, ex.4493 = 

             44.9 %.)

  1. If this percentage is greater than 60%, the student earns 100%. 

 

  1. If this percent is less than or equal to 60%, proceeds with calculation. 

 

Percentage earned from (multiplied by) Total aid disbursed, or could have been disbursed = AMOUNT STUDENT EARNED.

Subtract the Title IV aid earned from the total disbursed = AMOUNT TO BE RETURNED.

100% minus percent earned = UNEARNED PERCENT

Unearned percent (multiplied by) total institutional charges for the period = AMOUNT DUE FROM THE SCHOOL.

If the percent of Title IV aid disbursed is greater than the percent unearned (multiplied by) institutional charges for the period, the amount disbursed will be used in place of the percent unearned

If the percent unearned (multiplied by) institutional charges for the period are less than the amount due from the school, the student must return or repay one-half of the remaining unearned Federal Pell Grant.

Student is not required to return the overpayment if this amount is equal to or less than 50% of the total grant assistance that was disbursed /or could have been disbursed. The student is also not required to return an overpayment if the amount is $50 or less. 

The School will issue a grant overpayment notice to student within 30 days from the date the school’s determination that student withdrew, giving student 45 days to either:

  1. Repay the overpayment in full to NAME OF SCHOOL 

OR

  1. Sign a repayment agreement with the U.S.  Department of 

      Education. 

Order of Return

The School is authorized to return any excess funds after applying them to current outstanding Cost of Attendance (COA) charges. A copy of the Institutional R2T4 work sheet performed on your behalf is available through the office upon student request.

In accordance with Federal regulations, when Title IV, HEA financial aid is involved, the calculated amount of the R2T4 Funds” is allocated in the following order: 

  • Unsubsidized Direct Stafford loans (other than PLUS loans 
  • Subsidized Direct Stafford loans 
  • Direct PLUS loans 
  • Federal Pell Grants for which a Return is required
  • Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant 
  • Iraq and Afghanistan Service Grant for which a Return is required

Earned AID:

Title IV, HEA aid is earned in a prorated manner on a per diem basis (clock hours) up to the 60% point in the semester. Title IV, HEA aid is viewed as 100% earned after that point in time. A copy of the worksheet used for this calculation can be requested from the financial aid director.

Post Withdraw

If you did not receive all of the funds that you have earned, you may be due a post-withdraw disbursement. The School may use a portion or all of your post- withdraw disbursement for tuition and fees (as contracted with the School). For all other school charges, the School needs your permission to use the post-withdraw disbursement. If you do not give permission, you will be offered the funds. However, it may be in your best interest to allow the school to keep the funds to reduce your debt at the school.    For student loans that will be disbursed as a post withdrawal disbursement, you must have the student’s permission to disburse the loans.  

The post-withdrawal disbursement must be applied to outstanding institutional charges before being paid directly to the student.  Both grants and loans must be disbursed within 180 days of the date of determination in a post-withdrawal disbursement.

Institution Responsibilities 

The School’s responsibilities in regards to Title IV, HEA funds follow:

  • Providing students information with information in this policy;
  • Identifying students who are affected by this policy and completing the return of Title IV funds calculation for those students;
  • Returning any Title IV, HEA funds due to the correct Title IV programs.

 

The institution is not always required to return all of the excess funds; there are situations once the R2T4 calculations have been completed in which the student must return the unearned aid. 

Overpayment of Title IV, HEA Funds

Any amount of unearned grant funds that a student must return is called an overpayment. The amount of grant overpayment that you must repay is half of the grant funds you received. You must make arrangements with the School or Department of Education to return the amount of unearned grant funds.

Student Responsibilities in regards to return of Title IV, HEA funds

  • Returning to the Title IV, HEA programs any funds that were dispersed to the student in which the student was determined to be ineligible for via the R2T4 calculation.
  • Any notification of withdraw should be in writing and addressed to the appropriate institutional official.
  • A student may rescind his or her notification of intent to withdraw. Submissions of intent to rescind a withdraw notice must be filed in writing.
  • Either these notifications, to withdraw or rescind to withdraw must be made to the official records/registration personal at your school.

 

Refund vs. Return to Title IV

The requirements for the Title IV, HEA program funds when you withdraw are separate from any refund policy that The School may have to return to you due to a cash credit balance. Therefore, you may still owe funds to the school to cover unpaid institutional charges. The School may also charge you for any Title IV, HEA program funds that they were required to return on your behalf. 

If you do not already know what the School refund policy is, you may ask your Schools Financial Planner for a copy.

Return to Title IV questions?

If you have questions regarding Title IV, HEA program funds after visiting with your financial aid director, you may call the Federal Student Aid Information Center at 1-800-4-fedaid (800-433-3243). TTY users may call 800-730-8913. Information is also available on student aid on the web www.studentaid.ed.gov

 

*This policy is subject to change at any time, and without prior notice.

Careers Institute of America

Campus Security Act Disclosure Statement

 

The Campus Security Act (Public Law 102-26) requires postsecondary institutions to disclose the number of instances in which certain specific types of crimes have occurred in any building or on any property owned or controlled by this institution which is used for activities related to the educational purpose of the institution and/or any building or property owned or controlled by student organizations recognized by this institution. In compliance with that law, the following reflects this institutions crime statistics for the period between 1/1/2016 and 12/31/2018 (three most completed calendar years)

 

See attached map for the campus, which includes outlines the building and parking lots that students use while attending classes at Careers Institute of America.

 

Date updated as of August 12th, 2019

 

Report Distribution Date

Occurrences within the 2016, 2017 and 2018 Calendar Years

 

Crimes Reported 2016 2017 2018 Location:

C=Campus

N=Non-campus

P=Public

*Hate Crime?
Murder (Includes non-negligent manslaughter) 0 0 0
Negligent manslaughter 0 0 0
Sex offenses (forcible & non-forcible) 0 0 0
Robberies 0 0 0
Aggravated assaults 0 0 0
Burglaries 0 0 0
Motor Vehicle Thefts (on Campus) 0 0 0
arson 0 0 0
Larceny – Theft 0 0 0
Simple Assault 0 0 0
Intimidation
Destruction/Damage /Vandalism of property
Any other Crime involving bodily injury
Sex Offenses
  • Sex offenses – forcible
0 0 0
  • Sex offenses  – non-forcible
0 0 0

 

Number of arrest made for the following crimes 2016 2017 2018 Referred for campus disciplinary action?

(Yes)(No)

Liquor Laws 0 0 0
Drug Laws 0 0 0
Weapons Possession 0 0 0

 

Violence Against Women Act
2016 2017 2018 Location:

C=Campus

N=Non-campus

P=Public

Rape & Forcible Foundling 0 0 0
Sex offenses – forcible 0 0 0
Sex offenses  – non-forcible 0 0 0
Domestic violence  0 0 0
Dating violence 0 0 0
Stalking  (including cyber-stalking)

 

Hate Offenses:

 

The school must report by category of prejudice the following crimes reported to local police agencies or to a campus security authority that manifest evidence that the victim was intentionally selected because of the victim’s actual or perceived race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, ethnicity, or disability, as prescribed by the Hate Crimes Statistics Act (28 U.S.C 534) occurred

 

Contact Information:

Office Responsible to provide a copy of the Campus Security information Rakesh Dutta, Executive Director
Who to contact to report an incident at the Institution Rita Dutta, Admission DirectorOr Education  Director

 

*Crimes of murder, manslaughter, arson, forcible rape and aggravated assault that show evidence of prejudice based on race, religion, sexual orientation, ethnicity or disability as prescribed by the Hate Crime Statistical Act.

 

If you believe you are a victim of any of these situations you can and should seek out help and assistance from the following agencies:

Contact Information:

Who to contact to report an incident at the Institution Rakesh Dutta, Executive Director
Local Law enforcement agency to report an incident that occurred off campus Local Police Dept:214-671-3001
List agencies and contacts in your local area that can provide assistance to anyone who believes they are a victim and might need assistance. Dallas County Crime Victims:214-671-3587Mosaic Family Svc Inc: 214-831-1911

Promise House: 214-941-8578

 

General Information: 

 

  1. This institution does not employ campus security personnel but encourages both its employees and students to immediately report suspected criminal activity or other emergencies to the nearest available campus security officer, institutional official and/or in the event of emergency to directly contact local law enforcement or other emergency response agencies by dialing (911).

 

  1. All students and employees are required to report any crime or emergency to their institutional official promptly. If a student or employee wishes to report a crime on a voluntary or confidential basis, the institutional official will be prepared to record and report the crime, but not the name of the informant. The student or employee may, in order to maintain confidentiality, submit the information in writing to his/her institutional official without signature. If the student wishes no to maintain confidentiality, the student will contact his/her teacher or school official who in turn will contact the nearest supervisor to report criminal actions or emergencies to the appropriate agency by calling (911).

 

Preparation for the Annual Disclosure of Crime Statistics report is obtain by the institution’s secretary who contacts the correct police department District for statistics and the institution’s “Daily Incident Log”, and then records those statistics. 

 

  1. Only students, employees and other parties having business with this institution should be on institutional property. Staff, faculty, students, and prospective students or any person entering the premises must have and display at all times a security identification badge. Those without an identification badge must sign in at the entrance and identify their purpose of visit, the person to be visited and register their time in and out of the building. The visitor must also wear a visitor’s badge while on campus. All rear access doors leading to the campus are closed and locked during evening hours starting at 5:00pm.When the school closes for the night, the school’s official or supervisor will inspect each floor to see that it is empty and then set the alarms on each floor and then lock down the campus. Other individuals present on institutional property at anytime without the express permission of the appropriate institutional official(s) shall be viewed as trespassing and may as such be subject to a fine and/or arrest. In addition, students and employees present on institutional property during periods of non-operation without the express permission of the appropriate institutional official(s) shall also be viewed as trespassing and may also be subject to a fine and/or arrest.

 

  1. Current policies concerning campus law enforcement are as follows:

 

  1. Institution’s officials have no powers of arrest other than the Citizens Arrest Law, and are required in the event of a crime or emergency to call the correct agency or dial (911) for the police and emergency services. The Citizens Arrest Law will be invoked only as a last resort, and after all other possibilities have been explored. 
  2. Employees shall contact their immediate or nearest ranking supervisor to report any criminal action or emergency to the appropriate agency by calling (911). If possible, in the interim, the security guard(s) and or institutional official shall attempt to non-violently deal with the crime or emergency with the appropriate agency on campus. Individual discretion must be used, as undue risk should not be taken.
  3. The institution currently has no procedures for encouraging or facilitating pastoral or professional counseling (mental health or otherwise), other than the student or employee is encouraged to seek such aid.

 

  1. Though this institution does not offer regularly scheduled crime awareness or prevention programs, students are encouraged to exercise proper care in seeing to his/her own personal safety and the safety of others. The following is a description of policies, rules and programs designed to inform students and employees about the prevention of crimes on campus.

 

  1. Do not leave personal property in classrooms
  2. Report to your institutional official, any suspicious persons.
  3. Always try to walk in groups outside the school premises.
  4. If you are waiting for a ride, wait within sight of other people
  5. Employees (staff and faculty) will close and lock all doors, windows and blinds and turn off lights when leaving a room.
  6. The “Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act” is available upon request to students, employees (staff and faculty) and prospective students.
  7. The School has no formal program, other than orientation, that disseminates this information. All information is available on request.
  8. Information regarding any crimes committed on the campus or leased/attached properties (parking lot) will be available and posted in a conspicuous place within two (2) business days after the reporting of the crime and be available for sixty(60)business days during normal business hours, unless the disclosure is prohibited by law, would jeopardize the confidentiality of the victim, or an ongoing criminal investigation the safety of an individual, cause a suspect to flee evade detection: or result in the destruction of evidence. Once the reason for the lack of disclosure is no longer in force, the institution must disclose the information. If there is a request for information that is older than sixty 60 days, that information must be made available within two (2) business days of the request.

 

  1. The institution does not offer regularly scheduled crime awareness or prevention programs other than orientation where all the institution’s policies and regulations are properly disclosed to prospective students.

 

  1. All incidents shall be recorded in the Careers Institute of America daily Incident Log located on campus at the director’s office. The log includes the date, time, location, incident reported, and disposition of incident and the name of the person who took the report. The report must be entered in the log with two (2) business days after it is reported to the school’s official, unless that disclosure is prohibited by law, would endanger the confidentiality of the victim.

 

  1. This institution does not permit the sale, possession or consumption of alcoholic beverages on school property and adheres to and enforces all state underage-drinking laws.

 

  1. The institution does not permit the possession, use or sale of illegal drugs by its employees and students and adheres to and enforces all state and Federal drug laws. The violations of these policies by students or employees may result in expulsion, termination and/or arrest.
  2. Information concerning drug and alcohol abuse education program are posted at campus and is distributed annually to students and staff.  (Institutions are advised to make available to students and staff members information on an agency that provides counseling and help on drug and alcohol abuse education).

 

  1. Sexual assaults (criminal offences) on campus will be reported immediately to school director Rakesh Dutta, who will report it to (911) emergency and police units. The person who was victimized will be encouraged to seek counseling at a rape crisis center and to maintain all physical evidence until such a time as that person can be properly transported to a hospital or rape crisis center for proper treatment. 
  2. This institution has zero tolerance of such assault; the violation of this policy by students or employees may result in expulsion, while investigations are being followed, termination and/or arrest.

The Institution encourages all students and employees to be responsible for their own security and the security of others.  Please report any known criminal offenses occurring on campus to the school administration. 

 

  1. In the event a sex offense should occur on campus, the victim should take the following steps:
  • Report the offense to the school administration.
  • Preserve any evidence as may be necessary to the proof of the criminal offense.
  • Request assistance, if desired, from school administration in reporting the crime to local law enforcement agencies.
  • Request a change in the academic situation if necessary.
  1. On campus disciplinary action in cases of alleged sexual assault will be based on the findings of the law enforcement agency investigating the facts pertaining to the crime and other mitigating circumstances.  

 

  1. These records are available upon request through the administrative offices.

 

  1. Information for crime victims about disciplinary proceedings. The CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA will provide simultaneous notification, in writing, to both the accuser and the accused, of:
  • The result of any institutional disciplinary proceeding that arises from an allegation of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking
  • The school’s procedures for the accused and the victim to appeal the result of the institutional disciplinary proceeding. Any change to the result. When such results become final.

 

  1. Disciplinary  proceedings requirements:

The Institutions proceedings will:

  • Include a prompt, fair, and impartial process from the initial investigation to the final result
  • Be conducted by officials who, at a minimum, receive annual training on the issues related to dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking and on how to conduct an investigation and hearing process that protects the safety of victims and promotes accountability
  • Provide the accuser and the accused with the same opportunities to have others present during any institutional disciplinary proceeding, including the opportunity to be accompanied to any related meeting or proceeding by the advisor of their choice
  • Not limit the choice of advisor or presence for either the accuser or the accused in any meeting or institutional disciplinary proceeding; however the school may establish restrictions regarding the extent to which the advisor may participate in the proceedings, as long as the restrictions apply equally to both parties

 

  1. As part of the Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, the institution is required to make the following link/information available to the campus community where information can be accessed regarding registered sex offenders.  

Link: http://www.city-data.com/soz/soz-78613.htmlStudents and employees should refer to the following person or agency when reporting or seeking help on a criminal incident.  Please note that any emergency that requires immediate attention should not be waited upon on to report to the school’s President but rather contact the appropriate agency by calling (911).  

 

GENERAL EMERGENCY PROCEDURES

Who to Contact

All employees are expected to be familiar with and to follow procedures outlined in the Careers Institute of America Critical Response Plan.  In the case of an emergency or immediate or perceived threat toward the students and/or employees, or immediate or perceived threat toward any other person on the school premises, the employee is authorized make an emergency call to 911.  Instructors (including student instructors) and/or staff members should remain in the room with their students if they are notified of a possible emergency. As soon as is reasonably possible, the Administration should be notified of the threat.

 

Medical Attention

Anything requiring more than minor attention is to be referred to the local hospital.  Except in cases of severe illness or medical emergencies, students are considered mature enough to seek appropriate relief such as returning home, visiting the restroom, or seeking medical help.

PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY FOR SAFETY

No safety rule is a complete substitute for common sense, nor can safety rules be devised to cover every situation you experience.  For these reasons, good judgment must be used in every situation. Each person is responsible for the following:

 

Individual Responsibility

Follow the approved practices and procedures or standards which apply, on any work you perform for the school.

Use only the appropriate protective equipment and devices.  Use such equipment or devices whenever the hazard justifies their use or when so instructed by your supervisor.

It is the responsibility of everyone to make frequent inspections of tools and other equipment used to make sure such tools and equipment are in good physical condition.

Report to your Supervisor/Instructor any condition which might injure any person or damage any property.  The hazard should also be pointed out to others exposed to it in order to correct or avoid it before an accident occurs.

Any injury which occurs at school, no matter how slight, or any accident that causes damage to property shall be reported immediately to the School President.  All injuries and accidents should be reported to the Supervisor/Instructor by the end of the day.

If anyone observes another who is about to endanger themselves, another person, or property while at the School, they should intervene immediately in such a way as to not endanger themselves.

Alcoholic beverages are not allowed on the School property and use of such is prohibited.  No one is to report for work or class evidencing any effects of alcoholic consumption.

Controlled substances, such as marijuana and cocaine, are illegal by state and federal law.  Their use and possession are prohibited on school property.

Liquids such as water or oil, excessive dust/dirt, or any other debris spilled on floors represent serious slipping hazards and should be cleaned up immediately upon observation.

Accident Investigation and Reporting

Anyone who suffers an injury during school shall promptly report such injury to the Supervisor/ Instructor no later than end of the period on the day in which the injury occurred.

Every accident shall be investigated to determine the cause and the steps needed to prevent a recurrence.  It shall be the responsibility of the Supervisor/Instructor to obtain the complete and detailed facts of the accident as soon as possible after it occurs and to see that the required reports are made to the Administration.

Firearms

Firearms, ammunition, explosives or other weapons are prohibited on the school property.

Exceptions to this policy are limited to the following instances:

  • Department of Public Safety and other law enforcement agencies in performance of their normal duties may carry firearms on School property and
  • TCLEOSE approved students.

 

Good Housekeeping

Good Housekeeping is essential to safe operation.  It will result in fewer accidents and will reduce fire hazards.  Oil and chemical spills should be cleaned up promptly to eliminate slipping and fire hazards.  All work areas must be kept free of tools, materials, draped hoses, extension cords, and other objects which create hazards.  Cleaning up the area where you are working is part of the job. A job is not completed until the area is cleaned up.

FIRE PREVENTION AND SECURITY

Fire Prevention

Everyone should exercise good judgment and conduct themselves in a manner that would prevent fires while on School property.

No one should smoke in areas where “No Smoking” signs are posted, or where hazard from smoking exists.

If a fire should occur, contact your ED/instructor or the School President.

Stay calm.  If the fire is small, select the proper extinguisher and attack the fire (if this can be done safely).

The following chart describes the different types of fires normally encountered and the proper extinguisher to use in each case.

TYPES OF FIRES TYPES OF EXTINGUIDHER AND AGENT
Ordinary Combustible

Materials Such As

Paper, Wood, and Trash

Water (Preferred)

And 

Multi-purpose

Flammable Liquid

And Gases such As

Gasoline, Lubricating 

Oils and Natural Gas

Dry Chemical

(Preferred)

And

Carbon Dioxide

Electrical such as

Electronic Instruments

And Switchgear

Installations

Carbon dioxide

(Preferred)

And

Dry Chemical

 

Storage of Flammable Liquids

Metal containers and/or safety cans equipped with flame arresters and spring actuated caps should be used for the storage and handling of all flammable liquids with a flashpoint of less than 100 degree F

SOLVENTS, CHEMICALS & CHEMICAL CLEANING, WATER TREATMENT

Rule

All chemicals and solvents are treated as potential hazards from initial delivery to ultimate use and require the use of safe practices at all times.

Anyone handling flammable liquids or chemicals of any type should wear appropriate protective clothing and will comply with industry safe practices and the safety instructions on the container label in regards to both the use and storage of these materials.

Chemicals and materials with toxic fumes are to be used only in well-ventilated areas.

Responsibility

It is the responsibility of everyone to be aware of the hazards related to the use of solvents, chemical cleaning materials, and other chemicals and to enforce the rules related to their use.

Hazards to be considered when using solvents, chemical cleaning materials, and other chemicals are:

  • Contact with a hazardous material can cause skin rash or dermatitis, corrosive burns or eye damage.
  • Potential explosive or fire hazard.
  • The danger of ingestion of a poisonous, corrosive, or hazardous substance through the month or absorbed through the skin.
  • The inhalation of a volatile solvent, gas or toxic dust which may produce asphyxiation, intoxication, or damage to mucous membrane and internal organs.

First Aid

First aid procedures vary depending on the chemical nature of the materials in question.  Follow the instructions on the container label.

In the event that a person should come in contact with solvent or chemicals in the eyes or on the skin, the affected area should be irrigated for a minimum of fifteen (15) minutes.

If anyone ingests chemical materials or is splashed with a hazardous material and irrigation facilities are not available, they should immediately be referred to a hospital emergency room.

SEVERE WEATHER

Tornado

If (in the judgment of the President or administrator in charge) the treat of impending danger warrants it, the following actions may be taken:

  • Dismissal of all classes and assembly of students and employees into interior hallways and away from glass windows, doors and partitions.
  • Everyone should remain in these “safe” areas until in the opinion of the President the threat of danger is past.
  • If the tornado or destructive wind strikes the building, everyone should sit on the floor, with backs against the wall, their heads between their knees, and their hands clasped over the backs of their heads until all danger is past. 

Flooding

Because of the elevation of the School, buildings at Careers Institute of America are not likely to flood.  However, during periods of flooding, the President will remain in contact with appropriate authorities and will keep both students and employees advised of local road conditions.

Ice and Snow

In the event that ice and/or snow threaten to make highway travel hazardous, the President may dismiss classes to allow commuters to return home safely.

Closing the School as the Result of Severe Weather

Only the School Director has the authority to close the School.  When this action is taken, the School Director will notify the students and faculty.  In addition, it will be posted on the School’s website and the local radio station will be notified and asked to broadcast the notice of closing.

Self-Determination Policy

No student will attempt to attend class and no employee will report to work if, by their opinion or by the warning of law enforcement officials, travel conditions in their area are unsafe (or if other circumstances would place their lives/health in jeopardy).

EVACUATION PROCEDURES

Emergency Evacuation

Curing an emergency evacuation, each instructor is responsible for the safe and orderly evacuation of his/her class.  Instructors not in class should assist with any evacuation problems that may arise. It is the instructor’s responsibility to prevent panic, control traffic, and provide calm leadership.  The following guidelines should be observed:

  • Instructors should know the shortest route from the classroom to the nearest exit.
  • When the need to evacuate the building arises, the class should be directed to move single-file through the nearest exit and well beyond the building to an area of safety.
  • The instructor should be last to leave in order to check that all students are out of the classroom and to close the door.
  • Never return to the building until instructed to do so by the appropriate authorities.

 

 

  • Campus Security and Crime Prevention Policy

 

The CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA opened as a private post-secondary vocational institution January 2014.

THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA attempts to provide students and employees with a safe and secure environment in which to study and work.  The school is open during posted hours of operation, which are stated in the school catalog. School facilities are locked during times the CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA is not open. THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA has no residence halls or student housing.  

This report is intended to comply with the requirements of the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, as amended by the Higher Education Opportunity Act.  This report is updated annually and made available to current and incoming students and staff.


THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA maintains a campus security and crime prevention policy that conforms to the best practices possible. To be successful, these programs must embody the proper attitudes towards personal safety and crime prevention, on the part of both students and staff. It also requires cooperation in all safety and security related matters between student and teacher, teacher and administrator, and also between each student and his/her fellow students. Only through such a cooperative effort can a campus security and crime prevention program be established and preserved for the entire campus community.

The following campus safety measures are in place:

  • Keyed elevator access
  • Locking front door with video intercom secured access
  • 8 Security cameras recording 24/7
  • Teachers have a panic button alert  key chain ( in classroom) linked directly to the alarm company
  • AED device and all staff are trained in adult CPR with AED
  • Facility has an alarm system in place
  • Locking doors to office &  back staff areas
  • Locking doors to freight entrance and stairwell
  • Fire extinguishers as per Dallas fire code
  • Means of egress and exit signs posted as per Dallas fire code
  • Incident reports are in place to assure timely and appropriate care is provided for any injuries 

 

As part of student orientation, THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA also provides a description of school policies and procedures as well as outside resources available for students to inform them about campus security and crime prevention.

Security Policies and Crime Reporting Procedures 

It is the policy of THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA that students and employees shall report any and all safety hazards, crimes, and loss of property, significant illness, or injury to a school director. Proper reporting facilitates the apprehension of criminals and assists in making the entire campus safe. All school directors are mandated to investigate incidents and to coordinate with local law enforcement agencies to apprehend those who violate these regulations or commit crimes on campus. When necessary, THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA will press charges against criminal violators. 

THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA’s Executive Director, Rakesh Dutta, maintains a crime log in the school administrative offices.  The crime log records criminal incidents and alleged criminal incidents that are reported to the Campus Security Authorities.  To view the log, please stop by his office, contact him by phone 972-239-3630or by email rdutta@careers-ins.org

In terms of reporting crimes, THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA utilizes a spreadsheet that is maintained by the School’s Campus Security Authority (CSA).  All crime reporting is kept in a password protected, secure document data base. Records include, but are not limited to, copies of crime reports; records for arrests and referrals for disciplinary action; timely warning and emergency notification reports; documentation, such as letters to and from local police having to do with Clery Act compliance; letters to and from local authorities; correspondence with the Dept of Ed regarding Clery Act compliance and the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA); and copies of notices to students and employees about the availability of the annual security report. All documentation is dated and easily retrievable.

Please refer to the following table regarding THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA’s crime reporting procedures and emergency notification and evacuation procedures:

Policy or Procedure Response Time Frame
Emergency notification and evacuation procedures for alerting the campus community about significant confirmed emergencies or dangerous situations involving a immediate threat, significant emergency or dangerous situation involving a threat to the health or safety of students or employees. These policies and procedures are disclosed in THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA’s annual security report.  THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA will use emergency notification procedures whenever there is an immediate threat to the health or safety of students or employees on campus.
Issue timely warnings to alert the campus community about crimes that pose a serious or continuing threat to safety. These policies and procedures are disclosed in THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA’s annual security report.  THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA will issue a warning whenever there is a threat that a crime is ongoing or may be repeated.
Request crime statistics from local law enforcement in THE SCHOOL’s  local jurisdiction  THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA will make a request annually with the Dallas police Dept.
Publish an annual security report containing campus security policy disclosures and crime statistics for the previous three years. THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA will publish and distribute their report or provide a notice of its availability annually by Oct. 1.

Campus Security Authority 

 

THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA does not employ campus peace officers or contractual security officers. As such, school employees do not have powers of arrest and will call 911 in the event of a crime or other situation that warrants police intervention. Because THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA does not have a campus police department or security office, it does not keep a daily crime log.    

 

Campus Security Authority (CSA) officials are defined as school official(s) who have significant responsibility for student and campus activities, including, but not limited to student discipline and campus judicial proceedings or who has the authority and the duty to take action or respond to particular issues on behalf of the institution. At THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA, the Campus Security Authority officials are:

 

  1. Rakesh Dutta- Executive School Director

 

  1. Rita Dutta – Admission Director

 

In some circumstances, school departments, local, state or federal agencies may notify Campus Security officials of a possible emergency and may provide guidance to be used in verifying whether a significant emergency or dangerous situation exists.  For example the Board of Health may determine if there is an outbreak of a serious illness. The School may contact or be contacted by external law enforcement agencies, emergency management agencies, public health agencies or other agencies with expertise in the type of situation affecting the campus.  These agencies or departments may provide assistance and guidance in confirming the presence of an emergency or dangerous situation. Any school department that becomes aware of an emergency or dangerous situation shall report immediately to the School Directors.  

 

Upon learning that an emergency or dangerous situation may exist, Campus Security will confirm whether an emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to the health and/or 

welfare of students or employees exists and if the emergency is confirmed will begin the process of issuing an emergency notification.

 

Campus Security is responsible for determining the content of an emergency notification; the content of which is based on the circumstances and the manner in which the situation is impacting the campus.  A message may simply contain information about an area of the school to avoid or may have specific action recommendations or information about the nature of the incident itself.

 

A decision will be made on the system to be used to transmit emergency notifications.  These systems may include:

  • E-mail
  • Text messaging
  • Alarm system
  • Face book
  • Twitter
  • Radio and TV

 

Campus Evacuation:

 

To protect the campus population from the effects of emergencies protective action recommendations or evacuation instructions may be issued.   In the event of such an emergency, it is important to follow evacuation instructions disseminated through the communication system used to inform of the emergency.

 

At other times, the campus may be ordered to “lock down”. This means that if an incident occurs and the buildings or areas around campus become unstable, or if the air outdoors becomes dangerous due to toxic or irritating substances, it is usually safer to stay indoors because leaving the area may expose the student to anger.  The students are asked to stay in the same building until it is safe to go outside.  

 

The functions of the campus security authorities are to collect and report allegations of Clery Act crimes that they conclude were made in good faith. CSA’s are not responsible for determining authoritatively whether a crime took place and do not have the authority to apprehend any alleged perpetrator of a crime.

 

Policies for Preparing the Annual Disclosure of Crime Statistics

THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA’s yearly crime statistics are compiled on a calendar year basis and in accordance with the definitions of crime provided by the FBI for use in the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) systems. For sex offenses only, THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA uses definitions from the FBI’s National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) edition of the UCR. Hate crimes are classified according to the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting Hate Crime Data Collection Guidelines and Training Guide for Hate Crime Data Collection. 

On an annual basis, THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA will gather these statistics and report crimes that occurred on campus and on public property within, or immediately adjacent to and accessible from, the CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA campus. The school prepares this report to comply with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act (Clery Act). Nothing in the law shall be construed to permit THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA to retaliate, intimidate, threaten, coerce, or otherwise discriminate against any individual with respect to the implementation of the Clery Act.

To facilitate this, THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA has developed a relationship with PD’s Dept. of Community Affairs and the Public Affairs division of the Precinct. Additionally, THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA is able to access the PD’s crime statistics page at http:// dallaspolice.net/resources/Pages/Crime-reports.aspx

Personal Safety and Crime Prevention Tips

While THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA attempts to provide a safe and secure environment, students, faculty, staff and visitors are ultimately responsible for their own safety. As THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA becomes aware of relevant programs that address responsible practices and procedures that enhance personal safety, this information will added to this policy or kept on file in the schools administrative offices. If requested, such information may be obtained from a school director. As well, information about Personal Safety and Crime Prevention Tips will be handed out at new student orientations. 

Please see the following safety and crime prevention tips:

  1. Reduce or eliminate opportunities that may make you a target.
  2. Increase awareness in places you are most comfortable.
  3. Trust your instincts regardless of feeling embarrassed.
  4. Prepare your schedule daily with safety in mind.

 

Purse/Wallet Safety

  • Students should carry purses, portfolios or briefcases in a manner that will allow you to let go.  Straps placed across your shoulder, around your neck or wrapped around your waist have caused injuries because women could not free themselves during a purse snatch.

 

  • Always be aware of your surroundings and carry your pocketbook clasp toward you, close to your body, tucked in the bend of your elbow as if it were a football.  If there is a long strap, wrap it around the bag.

 

  • If someone attempts to snatch your pocket book, let go of it, especially if there is a weapon involved.  When dining out, the only place for your purse should be your lap.  The back of a chair is an easy target for a thief.  Never carry a wallet in a rear pocket; use a front trouser or an inside coat pocket. 

 

  • Be particularly aware of your purse/wallet in crowded situations, such as rush-hour trains and buses.  If you are jostled in a crowd, be aware that a pickpocket might be responsible.  Beware of arguments or commotions designed to distract you while your pocket or purse is being picked.

 

  • Minimize the amount  of money,  credit  cards and valuables  you carry by only taking items that are necessary for the day.  Divide money between your purse/wallet and pockets.  Carry your keys on your person separate from your identification

 

Walking – Be Street Smart

 

  • Use well-populated and well-lit streets. If you suspect you are being followed, stay away from deserted blocks and head for an area where there are people or to the nearest open store.  If you are driven home, ask the driver to wait until you are safely inside.  Should a motorist bother you while you are walking, reverse your direction. If you are still followed, seek a safe location and yell for help, if possible.

Elevator

 

  • When waiting for an elevator, leave the lobby/hallway if someone makes you feel uncomfortable.
    Check the elevator’s mirror before entering.  Stand between the control panel and door when in the elevator.  Exit the elevator if someone enters that makes you feel uneasy. If you feel the need to give an excuse, you can say, “Oh, I forgot my mail.”  If accosted, press as many buttons as possible to try and get the elevator to stop at the next floor.

Subway and Bus

 

  • Use only entrances marked by a green indicator, where there is a clerk present 24 hours a day.  Have your money or Metro Card available.  Use designated waiting areas during off-peak hours.  Ride in the conductor’s car during off-peak hours.  Sit in the center of the car, away from the door, to avoid a purse or chain snatch.

 

  • Cover jewelry; turn stone rings toward the palm side of your hand.  Stay awake and aware and exit with the crowd.  Wait and walk close to the wall.  Wait for the bus on the sidewalk away from the curb.  Sit near the front of the bus.  Be aware of your wallet/purse to avoid a pickpocket.

 

ATM

 

  • Be aware of suspicious people near the entrance.  Use well-lit, well-populated ATM’s.  Avoid ATM’s that have unlocked doors or are directly out on the street.  Block a bystander’s view when doing your transaction.  Use mirrors, positioned at the ATM, to see behind you.  Put your money away and take your card and receipt before exiting an ATM.  Your card is exclusively for your entry only. Make sure the door closes behind you.

 

Testing and Exercises

 

Exercises designed to test the School’s emergency procedures and preparedness are conducted at least annual and may be conducted in the form of a drill, tabletop, functional or full scale exercise.  These exercises may include not only school personnel but also surrounding jurisdiction first responders and government agencies, as well as members of the school community.

 

Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act (VAWA)

On March 7, 2013, President Obama signed the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (VAWA) (Pub. Law 113-4), which, among other provisions, amended section 485(f) of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended (HEA), otherwise known as the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (Clery Act). The Clery Act requires institutions like THE SCHOOL to comply with certain campus safety- and security-related requirements as a condition of participating in the Federal student financial aid programs authorized by Title IV of the HEA. Notably, VAWA amended the Clery Act to require institutions to compile statistics for incidents of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking and to include certain policies, procedures, and programs pertaining to these incidents in their annual security reports (ASRs). 

 

The changes made to the Clery Act by VAWA did not affect in ay way Title IX of the Education Amendment of 1972 (Title IX), its implementing regulations or associated guidance issued by the Department’s Office for Civil Rights (OCR) Nothing in the Clery Act, as amended by VAWA, alters or changes an institution’s obligations or duties under title IX as interpreted by OCR.  

In compliance to VAWA, THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA’s Campus Security and Crime Prevention Policy includes procedures to follow once an incident of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking has been reported, including a statement of the standard of evidence that will be used during any institutional conduct proceeding arising from such a report. 

This policy also includes information about a victim’s options for, and available assistance in, changing academic, living, and/or transportation situations if requested and reasonably available, regardless of whether the victim chooses to report the crime to campus authorities or local law enforcement.

Below is a list of the major changes that have been made to the Clery Act regulations and information regarding the 2015 Campus Safety and Security Survey, used to report Campus crime statistics to the Department:

Summary of the Major Changes to the Clery Act Regulations:

  • Require institution to collect and report information regarding incidents of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking that occur on an institution’s Clery Geography and are reported to a Campus Security Authority or to local law enforcement agencies;
  • Require institutions to disclose statistics of such incidents in their Annual Security Reports (ASRs) and the Campus Safety and Security Survey to maintain credible documentation that substantiates the institution’s crime statistics. 
  • Require institutions to have policies and procedures for victims or witnesses to report crimes on a voluntary, confidential basis for inclusion in the institution’s crime statistics. 
  • Clarify the very limited circumstances in which an institution may remove reports of crimes that have been “unfounded” by law enforcement officials and require institutions to report to the Department and disclose in the ASR the number of crimes that were “unfounded” and subsequently withhold from their crime statistics.
  • Revise the definition of “rape” to reflect the Federal bureau of Investigation’s (FBI) updated definition in the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Summary Reporting System, which encompasses the categories of rape, sodomy, and sexual assault with an object that are used the UCR National Incident-Based Reporting System;
  • Revise the categories of bias for the purposes of Clery Act hate crime reporting to add gender identity and to separate ethnicity and national origin into different categories;
  • Require institutions to provide information on culturally relevant, inclusive prevention awareness programs to incoming students and new employees, as well as describe these programs in their ASRs.  These programs must include: a statement that the institution prohibits the crime of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking; the definitions of these terms in the applicable jurisdiction; the definition of “consent,” in reference to sexual activity, in the applicable jurisdiction; a description of safe and positive options for bystander intervention; information on risk reduction; and information on the institution’s policies and procedures after a sex offense occurs;
  • Require institution to provide and describe in their ASRs, ongoing prevention and awareness campaigns for students and employees.  These campaigns must include the same information as the institution’s primary prevention and awareness program;
  • Define the terms “awareness programs,” “bystander intervention,” “ongoing prevention and awareness campaigns,” “primary prevention programs,” and “risk reduction”;
  • Require institutions to describe each type of disciplinary proceedings used by the institution in cases of alleged dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking; the steps, anticipated timelines, and decision-making process for each type of disciplinary proceeding; how to file a disciplinary complaint; how the institution determines which type of proceeding to use based on the circumstances of an allegation of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking; and the standard of evidence that will be used during the disciplinary proceeding;
  • Require institutions to list all of the possible sanctions that the institution may impose following the results of any institutional disciplinary proceedings for an allegation of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking;
  • A student victim’s past sexual conduct may not be used against them during a rape trial.  
  • A victim will not be forced to bear the expense of their own rape exams or for service of a protection order. The protection order will be recognized and enforced in all states, tribal and territorial jurisdictions within the U.S.    
  • Require institutions to describe the range of protective measures that the institution may offer following an allegation of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking; 
  • Require institutions to provide students or employees who report being victims of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault or stalking with a written explanation of their rights and options, regardless of whether the offense occurred on campus, including written notification of counseling, health, mental health, victim advocacy, legal assistance, visa and immigration assistance, student financial aid, and other services available for victims both within the institution and in the community, and the availability of changes to academic, living, transportation, and working situations, or protective measures regardless of whether the victim reports to law enforcement.
  • Focus attention on the needs of underserved communities, including creating legal relief for battered immigrants so that abusers cannot use the victim’s immigration status to prevent victims from calling the police or seeking safety and supporting tribal governments in building their capacity to protect American Indian and Alaska Native women.
  • Require institutions to provide for a prompt, fair, an impartial disciplinary proceeding in cases of alleged dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking in which: (1) officials are appropriately trained and do not have a conflict of interest or bias for or against the accuser or the accused; (2) the accuser and the accused have equal opportunities to have others present, including an advisor of their choice; (3) the accuser and the accused receive simultaneous notification, in writing, of the result of the proceedings and any available appeal procedures; (4) the proceeding is completed in a reasonably prompt time frame; (5)the accuser and the accused are given timely notice of meetings at which one or the other or both may be present; and (6) the accuser, the accused and appropriate officials are given timely and equal access to information that will be used during information  and formal disciplinary meetings and hearings.
  • Define the terms “proceeding” and “result”; and
  • Specify that compliance with these provisions does not constitute a violation of section 444 of the General Education Provisions Act, commonly known as FERPA (1974).  

2014 ASRs and Statistics for the 2013 Calendar Year:

For their 2014 ASRs, institutions were required to make a good-faith effort to include incidents of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking in the crime statistics for calendar year 2013.  Institutions also were required to make a good-faith effort to ensure that the statistics for the new crime categories were accurate and complete in their ASRs with the understanding that institutions may not have complete statistics for 2013.  

 

Missing Student Notification Policy

 

There are no campus housing facilities at THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA so a missing student notification policy is not mandated. When a student is absent 5 days in a row, the student’s home is called and messages are left to have the student get in touch with the school to indicate a reason for absence. The missing student’s emergency contacts are also contacted by phone. This policy is separate from THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA’s academic attendance polices.

 

Disciplinary Proceedings

THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA does not tolerate violence or other threatening conduct against any members of the school community.  This includes criminal acts against persons or property, as well as harassment based on sex, gender, race, ethnicity, or disability. The school will impose strict disciplinary actions and appropriately involve law enforcement officials should any acts of violence or threatening conduct occur on school facilities or at school- sponsored events.  This includes acts of violence against women.

The school will, upon written request, disclose to the alleged victim of a crime of violence, or a non-forcible sex offense, the results of any disciplinary hearing conducted by the school against the student who is the alleged perpetrator of the crime or offense. If the alleged victim is deceased as a result of the crime or offense, the school will provide the results of the disciplinary hearing to the victim’s next of kin, if so requested.

Voluntary Crime Reporting

If anyone is aware that a crime is being, or has been committed on the school campus or at a school-sponsored/related event off-campus, the crime should be reported as soon as possible to the School Administration as well as the local law enforcement.  If the crime has occurred during non-business hours and the School’s office cannot be reached, local law enforcement can be contacted immediately and it should be reported directly to the school as soon as possible the next business day. Immediate notification should be made to the following:

Rakesh Dutta, Executive School Director

Rita Dutta, Admission Director

13614 Midway Road, Dallas, TX- 75244

 

Upon notification, an Executive Director will work with local law enforcement, as appropriate, when a crime is reported.  Crimes reported to the school are included in the annual campus crime statistics. In addition, the school will request crime information from Dallas police Department or other local law enforcement agencies that may have not been reported to the school’s administrative office and, if appropriate, include it in the annual campus crime statistics.  Further, if circumstances warrant, the school community will be notified if an on-going threat is posed to the campus community related to a reported crime.

Voluntary, Confidential Crime Reporting 

All reports of crime or misconduct will be investigated and all criminal violations of the law will be referred to law enforcement agencies.  When a potentially dangerous threat to the campus community arises, timely reports or warnings will be issued through e-mail announcements, mass text messages, in-class announcements, or other appropriate means of communication. 

If warranted, pastoral counselors and professional counselors must inform persons they are counseling of the procedures to report crimes on a voluntary, confidential basis for inclusion in the annual disclosure of crime statistics. That being said, THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA does not employ any campus-based pastoral or professional counselors. 

Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention 

Please refer to THE SCHOOL’s policy regarding Drug and Alcohol abuse prevention. Anyone violating this policy will be removed from school property and disciplinary action will be taken. THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA’s Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Policy is reviewed by the school on a biannual basis and given to students at the time of enrollment and employee each year.

The State of Taxes sets 21 as the minimum age to purchase or possess any alcoholic beverage. Specific ordinances regarding violations of alcohol laws, including driving while intoxicated, are available from the school administrative office. Effective January 1, 1990, a package of state laws was passed regarding alcohol. They include the following: 

  1. Persons under age 21 found possessing alcohol may be given a maximum fine of $50. 

 

Anyone convicted of fraudulently using a driver’s license to buy or attempt to buy alcohol may have his/her driver’s license suspended for up to 90 days. 

  1. Persons convicted of buying alcohol through fraudulent means face a possible $100 fine and/or being required to do up to 30 hours of community service work. 

 

A violation of any law regarding alcohol is also a violation of the CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA’s Student Code of Conduct and will be treated as a separate disciplinary matter by the school.

The CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA campus is drug free and only under specific school-mandated circumstances is the consumption of alcohol permitted. The possession, sale, manufacture or distribution of any controlled substance is illegal under both TX state and federal laws. Such laws are strictly enforced by the Taxes. Violators are subject to school sanctions, criminal prosecution, fine and imprisonment.

Sexual Assault and Related Crimes

 

THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA is committed to creating and maintaining an educational environment free from all forms of sex discrimination, including sexual misconduct. Any act involving sexual harassment, violence, coercion, and intimidation will not be tolerated. Specifically, THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA strictly prohibits the offenses of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking. 

THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA encourages the reporting of sexual misconduct that is prompt and accurate. This allows the school’s directors to quickly respond to allegations and offer immediate support to the victim. THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA is committed to protecting the confidentiality of victims, and will work closely with students who wish to obtain confidential assistance regarding an incident of sexual misconduct. All allegations will be investigated promptly and thoroughly, and both the victim and the accused will be afforded equitable rights during the investigative process.

It is the collective responsibility of all members of the CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA community to foster a safe and secure campus environment. In an effort to promote this environment and prevent acts of sexual misconduct from occurring, THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA engages in ongoing prevention and awareness education programs. All incoming students and employees are required to receive educational materials about these subjects, and all members of the school community are encouraged to participate in training focused on the prevention of sexual misconduct. 

This policy applies to all members of the CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA campus community, including students, faculty, staff, visitors, independent contractors, and other third parties who are on campus and involved in an incident of sexual misconduct (this can be someone who witnessed an incident or who wishes to report an incident on behalf of another). The policy applies to these parties regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity. 

THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA’s Sexual Assault and Related Crimes policy prohibits all forms of sexual misconduct. This broad term includes, but is not limited to, acts of sexual harassment, sexual violence, sexual coercion, sexual threats or intimidation, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, stalking, and cyber-stalking. Please refer to the Crime Definitions section for a complete list of terms and prohibited acts.

This policy covers conduct that takes place on THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA’s campus and public property within or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus. This also includes any building or property not within the same reasonably contiguous geographic 

area of the School that supports or relates to the school’s educational purposes and is frequently used by students, such as affiliation sites used for school internships. 

This policy covers all educational programs, and campus and school-related activities, including, but not limited to, student organizations (course review sessions, tutoring sessions, barbell club) community organizations with student [and/or faculty] participation, and all other educational or extracurricular events hosted by or at THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA. 

This policy covers sexual misconduct occurring between individuals in various types of relationships. These include, but are not limited to, student to student, staff to staff, faculty member to faculty member, visitor/contracted employee to faculty/staff, faculty member to student, staff to student, supervisor to subordinate, and Focus Integrated Fitness employees and THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA students.  Sexual misconduct may be acts committed by an individual or collective actions committed by members of a group or organization. These acts may be committed against an individual or against a group or organization. These acts may be committed by a stranger, an acquaintance, or someone with whom the victim has a social, romantic, or intimate relationship. These acts may be committed by or against any individual, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity.

Reporting Sexual Assault:

Students who are survivors of sexual assault are strongly encouraged to report the assault.  The student may request the assistance of the administration to report the assault.

Reporting assault t law enforcement does not require filing criminal charges but it does allow support systems to be put in place for the survivor. Filing a police report will provide the opportunity for the collection of evidence helpful in prosecution and will allow the student to be connected with the appropriate support and medical resources.

Students who are reporting an immediate assault should be accompanied to a heath care facility of their choice to allow for the collection of evidence and treatment.    Sexual assaults for which students seek medical treatment must be reported to the appropriate policy agency by health care officials. However the student is not required to file a police report.

If requested by the survivor the school will assist the survivor I changing his/her academic situation after the alleged assault.

Establishing Time Frames for the Review Process 

THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA is committed to maintaining the privacy of all individuals involved in a report of sexual misconduct and will conduct a timely review of all complaints of domestic violence, dating violence, and/or stalking. Unless there are extenuating circumstances, review and resolution is expected to take place within sixty (60) calendar days from receipt of the complaint. 

The preliminary review of all complaints, including any necessary interviews to be conducted and any necessary interim measures to be put in place, will usually be completed within 5 days of receipt of the complaint.

The subsequent, comprehensive review and investigation of the complaint, including interviews with all involved parties and gathering of evidence, is usually completed within 10 days of receipt of the complaint. 

Results of the complaint, via either a formal hearing or waiver of hearing are typically issued within 15 days of receipt of the complaint.

An appeal of the results must be submitted within 7 days of receipt of the written result. Unless there are extenuating circumstances, decisions on appeals are typically issued within 5 days of submission of the appeal. 

 

Evidence 

Evidence to be presented by complainant(s) and respondent(s) during any hearing on the charges must be shared with the opposing party at least three (3) business days in advance of the scheduled hearing. The School Director presiding at and/or hearing the case may exclude evidence that has not be shared or adjourn the hearing to afford all parties the opportunity to review evidence to be presented during the hearing. The School Director presiding at and/or hearing the case will make the final decision relating to the admissibility of all evidence.

Notification 

Both parties must be notified simultaneously and in writing of: 

  1. The result of the disciplinary proceeding; 
  2. Any petition for appeal (which should be available to both parties); 
  3. Any change to the result that may occur prior to the time that the result becomes final
  4. When the results become final.

 

Notification of findings 

Within five (5) business days after the adjournment of the hearing, the student conduct hearing body shall submit written findings of fact, conclusions regarding the charge(s), and imposition of a sanction, if any, to the respondent and any school official who is determined by the presiding School Director to have a legitimate interest in the result. In the case of sexual misconduct and violations involving dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking, both the complainant and respondent shall also receive simultaneous notice of the results and sanctions imposed (and the rationale for the result and sanctions), as well as notice of any possible changes to the result that may occur before it becomes final, and when the result becomes final.

Sanctions 

THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA L considers dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking as extremely serious violations and subject to suspension and/or expulsion from THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA. 

Retaliation

No member of the CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA community shall retaliate, intimidate, threaten, coerce or otherwise discriminate against a person who files a complaint, serves as a witness, or assists or participate in a proceeding in any manner. Participants who experience retaliation should report the incident to a School Director. 

Where to Report All Acts of Sexual Misconduct/Violence 

  1. Filing a Complaint with the School:

 

A student may report sexual misconduct, including sexual harassment, sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, stalking, and cyber-stalking to the following school officials:

 

  1. Rakesh Dutta- Executive School Director
  2. Rita Dutta- Admission School Director
  3. Jorge Perez – Assistant School Director

 

  1. Filing a Complaint with a State and/or Federal Agency: 

 

A student who is not satisfied with the CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA’s handling of a complaint, may also file a complaint with federal and state agencies. A list of agencies can be found on page 21 and 22 of this policy handout.

 

  1. Dual Filing a Complaint with the School and a State and/or Federal Agency:

 

In addition, the Complainant may file a complaint with the appropriate State or Federal agency at any point during the process. A list of agencies can be found on page 21 and 22 of this policy handout.

The school will work with the victim, should it be requested, in making changes that can be reasonably accommodated relative to the student’s academic, living, work and/or transportation situation. Though THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA does not provide student housing, 

 

THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA is still obligated to comply with a student’s request for a living and/or academic situation change following an alleged sex offense.  All determinations are at the sole discretion of the school.

 

THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA educates the student community about sexual assaults and date rape through material handed out at the student orientations. Dallas Police Department also offers sexual assault education and information programs to school students and employees upon request. Literature on date rape education, risk reduction, and response is available upon request to a school director. 

 

Student Disciplinary and Employee Disciplinary Complaints: 

Potential Outcomes under the Procedures: 

  1. Criminal Complaints: The complaint may result in criminal penalties, such as fine, community service, probation, jail sentence, registration as a sex offender with the TX or Federal data bases. 

 

  1. Institutional Complaints: 

 

    1. Under the sexual harassment policy, if there is a finding that a sexual assault may have occurred and the alleged perpetrator is: 

 

 

  • A student, then the matter is referred to a school Director for student discipline, and the penalties may be disciplinary probation, suspension or expulsion from the School. 

 

 

 

  • An employee, then the matter is referred to a School Director for employee discipline and the penalties may include fines, formal counseling, probation, suspension with or without pay, or termination from employment. 

 

 

  1. Under the Student Disciplinary process penalties may be probation, suspension or dismissal from the school. 

 

  1. Under the Employee Disciplinary process, the penalties may be fines, formal counseling, probation, suspension with or without pay, or termination from employment.

 

THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA is firmly committed to a policy that encourages timely disclosure of sexual misconduct. Any person, who, in good faith, reports sexual misconduct will be protected from retaliation (defined as an adverse action taken because an individual has engaged in protected activities), threats of retaliation, suspension or discharge from an educational opportunity or employment, or any other forms or means of discrimination because this person reported sexual misconduct.

 

If a student becomes the victim of a sexual assault at THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA, their first priority should be to get to a place of safety. They should then obtain necessary medical treatment. THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA strongly advocates that a victim of sexual assault report the incident in a timely manner. Time is a critical factor for evidence collection and preservation. An assault should be reported directly to a school director and/or to a school faculty. Filing a police report with a School CSA will not obligate the victim to prosecute, nor will it subject the victim to scrutiny or judgmental opinions from officers. By filing a police report, victims are assured of the following: 

 

  • The victim of sexual assault receives the necessary medical treatment and tests, at no expense to the victim; 

 

  • Provide the opportunity for collection of evidence helpful in prosecution, which cannot be obtained later (ideally a victim of sexual assault should not wash, douche, use the toilet, or change clothing prior to a medical/legal exam);

 

  • Assure the victim has access to free confidential counseling from counselors specifically trained in the area of sexual assault crisis intervention. 

 

THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA will also provide notification to students of existing off-campus counseling, mental health or other student services for victims of sex offenses, if requested. The school encourages students and employees to take advantage of these materials and programs that promote awareness of rape, acquaintance rape, and other forcible and non-forcible sex offenses available through local community agencies.  Please see the list below for counseling and support services outside the school system: 

 

Texas Alliance against Sexual Assault 

6200 LA CALMA DR AUSTIN, TX 78752

PHONE: 512-474-7190

HTTP://TAASA.ORG

 

DALLAS AREA RAPE CRISIS CENTER 

8198 Walnut Hill Lynn, Dallas, TX 75231

Phone: 214-345-5096

http://www.dallasrapecrisis.org

 

Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network (RAINN)

Toll-free Hotline: 1-800-656-HOPE

www.rainn.org

 

National Sexual Violence Resource Center

123 North Enola Drive

Enola, PA 17025

Phone: (717) 909-0710

Toll-free: 1-877-739-3895

www.nsvrc.org

 

Bystander Intervention Programs: 

 

THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA will provide safe and positive options for bystander interventions that an individual may take to prevent harm or intervene in risky situations. 

 

Bystander Intervention programs are defined as programs to teach men and women how to speak out against rape myths, and to intervene if someone is at risk of being assaulted. These programs have been shown to be an effective prevention tool. 

 

Below are some resources that THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA uses to help teach Bystander Intervention: 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A common challenge with increasing bystander participation is that bystanders are often unsure of themselves as responders and unclear about whether intervention is unwelcome or needed. To help address this challenge, THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA also recommends the following bystander intervention programs: 

 

 

 

 

 

Registered Sex Offenders

The Jacob Wetterling Act (42 USC 14071(j)) requires TX state to obtain information concerning registered sex offenders’ enrollment or employment at institutions of higher education.  Those seeking to obtain information about registered sex offenders should visit the following website: www.nsopr.gov   Furthermore, to the extent the TX State notifies THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA of information concerning registered sex offenders, the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) does not prevent  from disclosing such information. 

 

Also in accordance with the Federal Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act, registered sex offenders are required to register the name and address of any post-secondary school at which he or she is a student or employee. The Taxes State Division of Criminal Justice maintains a registry of convicted sex offenders and may inform a school officer of the presence on campus of a registered sex offender as a student or employee.

 

Information about Level 2 or Level 3 registered sex offenders on campus is available from a school director. To obtain information about Level 3 offenders, you may contact the TX State Criminal Justice Service’s registry Web site at http://www.criminaljustice.ny.gov/SomsSUBDirectory/search_index.jsp  and then click on “Search Level 2 or 3” on the right hand menu.  To obtain information about Level 2 offenders, contact the local police precinct in which the offender resides, or the TX State Division of Criminal Justice Service’s sex offender registry at 800-262-3257.

 

Bias-Related Crimes

To ensure an environment where an individual can achieve his/her academic and/or career goals, the Legislature of the State of Taxes has established, in compliance with state laws, policies and procedures to protect the entire school community from what has been termed “bias-related crime.” As required by law, we are providing information about bias-related crimes and crime prevention. .

Definition of Bias-Related Crime

Bias-related offenses occur when persons are harassed, annoyed, threatened, alarmed, struck, shoved, kicked, or subjected to physical contact because of their race, color, religion, national origin, ancestry, gender, religious practice, age, sexual orientation, or disability. A racially or religiously targeted incident is an act or attempt by any person or group of persons against the person or property of another individual or group which may in any way constitute an expression of racial or religious hostility. This includes: threatening phone calls, graffiti, hate mail, physical assaults, vandalism, cross burning, fire bombing, and the like. Bias-related crime can be broken down into two legal categories: aggravated harassment in the first degree (Texas Penal Code Section 42.07) An offense under this section is a Class B misdemeanor, except that the offense is a Class A misdemeanor if the actor has previously been convicted under this section; such investigations are given priority by school officials.

First- and Second-Degree Harassment

According to the Texas State Penal Code, aggravated harassment in the second degree occurs when a person: “Strikes, shoves, kicks, or otherwise, subjects another person to physical contact, or attempts or threatens to do the same because of the race, color, religion, or national origin of such person.” A person is guilty of aggravated harassment in the first degree when, with the intent to harass, annoy, threaten, or alarm another person, because of the race, color, religion, or national origin of such person, he/she: “Damages premises primarily used for religious purposes, or acquired pursuant to Section 6 of the religious corporation law and maintained for the purpose of religious instruction, and the damage to the premises exceeds $50.” 

 

THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA’s Policy for Dealing with Bias-Related Crimes

 It is our policy to ensure that the rights guaranteed by Taxes State law and the U.S. Constitution are protected for all citizens, regardless of race, color, ethnicity, or religion. When such rights are infringed upon by violence, threats, or other harassment, THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA will use every resource necessary to rapidly and decisively identify the perpetrator(s), arrest them, and bring them to trial.

Students who have been victims of bias-related crimes should immediately report the incident to one of the following: 

Rakesh Dutta- Executive School Director

 

Should a student become a victim of a bias-related crime, all materials pertaining to the crime should be preserved, documented, and reported immediately to the aforementioned officials.

Preventing Bias-Related Crimes

Differences among people, as well as their similarities, need to be discussed so that all can learn to appreciate the uniqueness of every group. In THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA’s multicultural and multiethnic community, we hope that through we may be able to help each student understand and contest negative racial attitudes, religious discrimination, and cultural intolerance. 

Counseling and Support Services for Victims of Bias-Related Crimes 

Anyone who is a victim of a bias-related crime is encouraged to seek counseling from a trained mental health professional. THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA will assist any student wishing to contact outside agencies, including local police, regarding charges and complaints of a bias-related crime. 

Off-Campus Resources 

  1. Dallas Police Department, 1400 S Lamar St, Dallas, TX 75215 (214) 671-3001
  2. Addison Policy Department, 4799 Airport Pkwy, Addison, TX 75001
  3. Dallas Victims Services Agency; 1400 S. Lamar, 5th Floor, Dallas, Texas, 75215. 214-671-3584.

This service is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and provides crisis intervention for crime victims. 

  1. Gay & Lesbian Anti-Violence Project; 212-807-0197 (24-hour hotline). This service is open 10 am–8 pm, Monday–Thursday, and 10 am–6 pm, Friday. It provides short-term crisis counseling, advocacy services, and referrals for long-term counseling.
  2. National Hate Crimes Hotline; 208-246-2292.

Crime Codes and Definitions

 

In compliance with federal law, in an effort to promote the personal safety of the school community, the following information has been prepared for review. THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA must produce and distribute an annual report containing the crime statistics defined in the school’s stated security policies. This report focuses on the federal requirements under the Jeanne Clery Disclosure Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act and the Violence against Women Act (VAWA).   As of 2015, the following categories of crimes on the campus, certain non-campus properties, and certain public property areas will be reported to the local police:

  1. Homicide:

 

  1. Manslaughter by Negligence: The killing of another person by gross negligence

 

  1. Murder and Non-negligence Manslaughter: The willful (non-negligent) killing of one human being by another

 

  1. Sex Offenses: Any sexual act directed against another person, forcibly and/or against that person’s will where the victim is incapable of giving consent

 

  1. Forcible Rape: The carnal knowledge of another person, forcibly and/or against that person’s will where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her youth or because his/her temporary or permanent incapacity.

 

  1. Fondling: The touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, without consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her youth or because his/her temporary or permanent incapacity.

 

The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) and its proposed regulations require the inclusion of certain Texas State definitions in a campus’s Annual Security Report and also require that those definitions be provided in campaigns, orientations, programs and trainings for employees and students. These required terms and definitions are:  

  1. Consent: Lack of consent results from: forcible compulsion; or incapacity to consent; or where the offense charged is sexual abuse or forcible touching, any circumstances, in addition to forcible compulsion or incapacity to consent, in which the victim does not expressly or impliedly acquiesce in the actor’s conduct. Where the offense charged is rape in the third degree, a criminal sexual act in the third degree, or forcible compulsion in circumstances under which, at the time of the act of intercourse, oral sexual conduct or anal sexual conduct, the victim clearly expressed that he or she did not consent to engage in such act, and a reasonable person in the actor’s situation would have understood such person’s words and acts as an expression of lack of consent to such act under all the circumstances. A person is incapable of consent when he or she is: less than 17 years old; or mentally disabled; or mentally incapacitated; or physically helpless; or committed to the care and custody of the state department of correctional services, a hospital, the office of children and family services and is in residential care, or the other person is a resident or inpatient of a residential facility operated by the office of mental health, the office for people with development disabilities, or the office of alcoholism and substance abuse services, and the actor is an employee, not married to such person, who knows or reasonably should know that such person is committed to the care and custody of such department or hospital. 

 

  1. Consent, abbreviated: Clear, unambiguous, and voluntary agreement between the participating to engage in specific sexual activity. 

 

  1. Dating Violence: Texas State does not specifically define “dating violence.” However, under Texas State Law, intimate relationships are covered by the definition of domestic violence when the act constitutes a crime listed elsewhere in this document and is committed by a person in an “intimate relationship” with the victim. See “Family or Household Member” for definition of “intimate relationship.” 
  2. Domestic Violence: An act which would constitute a violation of the penal law, including, but not limited to acts constituting disorderly conduct, harassment, aggravated harassment, sexual misconduct, forcible touching, sexual abuse, stalking, criminal mischief, menacing, reckless endangerment, kidnapping, assault, attempted murder, criminal obstruction or breaching or blood circulation, or strangulation; and such acts have created a substantial risk of physical or emotional harm to a person or a person’s child. Such acts are alleged to have been committed by a family member. The victim can be anyone over the age of sixteen, any married person or any parent accompanied by his or her minor child or children in situations in which such person or such person’s child is a victim of the act. 

 

  1. Sexual Assault: Texas State does not specifically define sexual assault. However, according to the Federal Regulations, sexual assault includes offenses that meet the definitions of rape, fondling, incest, or statutory rape as used in the FBI’s UCR program. 

 

  1. Stalking:  The term stalking means intentionally engaging in a course of conduct, directed at a specific person, which is likely to causes a reasonable person to fear for his or her safety or the safety of others or cause that person to suffer substantial emotional damage. Examples include, but are not limited to, repeatedly following such person(s), repeatedly committing acts that alarm, cause fear, or seriously annoy such other person(s) and that serve no legitimate purpose, and repeatedly communicating by any means, including electronic means, with such person(s) in a manner likely to intimidate, annoy, or alarm him or her. 

 

 

Arrest and Referral 

 

Federal law also requires that THE CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA provide statistics for the following categories of arrest or referrals for campus disciplinary action (if an arrest was not made): liquor law violation, drug law violation, and illegal weapons possession.

  1. Weapon Law Violations The violation of laws or ordinances dealing with weapon offenses regulatory in nature, such as: manufacture, sale, or possession of deadly weapons; carrying deadly weapons, concealed or openly. 

 

  1. Drug Abuse Violations: Violations of state and local laws relating to the unlawful possession, sale, use, growing, manufacturing, and making of narcotic drugs. The relevant substances include, but are not limited to: opium or cocaine; synthetic narcotics (e.g., Demerol, methadone); and dangerous non-narcotic drugs (e.g., barbiturates, Benzedrine). 

 

  1. Liquor Law Violations The violation of laws or ordinances prohibiting the manufacture, sale, transporting, furnishing, possessing of intoxicating liquors, maintaining an unlawful drinking place; bootlegging; operating a still; furnishing liquor to a minor or intemperate person; using a vehicle for illegal transportation of liquor; drinking on a train or public conveyance; and all attempts to commit any of the aforementioned. (Drunkenness and driving under the influence are not included in this definition.

 

Reporting Locations

 

For the purpose of reporting, the school’s crime statistics are compiled in accordance with the categories of on-campus and public properties as per the following definitions:

 

  1. On-Campus : Any building or property owned or controlled by an institution within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area and used by the institution in direct support of, or in a manner related to, the institution’s educational purposes, including residence halls; and Any building or property that is within or reasonably contiguous to paragraph (1) of this definition, that is owned by the institution but controlled by another person, is frequently used by students, and supports institutional purposes 

 

  1. Non-campus Buildings/Property: Any building or property owned or controlled by an institution that is used in direct support of, or in relation to, the institution’s educational purposes, is frequently used by students, and is not within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of the institution.

 

  1. Public Property: All public property that is within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of the institution, such as a sidewalk, street, other thoroughfare, or parking facility and is adjacent to a facility owned or controlled by the institution or the facility, and is used by the institution in direct support of, or in a manner related to, the institution’s educational purposes.

 

CRITICAL INCIDENT RESPONSE PLAN

OBJECTIVES

  1. To coordinate the School’s response to critical incidents while pay special attention to the safety and security needs of members of the Careers Institute of America community.

 

  1. To maintain the safety and security of faculty, staff and students as a whole in the event of a critical incident.

 

  1. To provide counseling, guidance, and appropriate support services to the families, friends, students, and campus community members in the event of a critical incident.

 

DEFINITION OF A CRITICAL INCIDENT

A critical incident is a situation that involves Careers Institute of America student(s) and/or employee(s) that creates a major disruption of normal operations and calls for a response beyond normal school operational procedures.  Examples may be situations such as natural/structural disasters, violent behavior or life threatening injury or illness.

(Note:  this plan is for general information only.  During an actual critical incident, variations might be made depending on the nature of the event and the situation.)

 

STUDENT ASSISTANCE SERVICES

Personal Counseling Referrals

The President of Careers Institute of America will act as the referral agent for student seeking assistance for emotional or personal counseling services.

PROCDURES FOR Careers Institute of America

Step 1 Careers Institute of America – The President or School Director is notified of a critical incident involving a Careers Institute of America student or employee at (972)-239-3630 during the day, (914) 527-1453 after hours or holidays.

First responders may call 911 if they determine that immediate medical attention is necessary.  Once emergency services have been contacted, all steps in this process must be followed.  

Step 2 Careers Institute of America – The President gathers information concerning the critical incident and responds accordingly.

 In the event that scheduled classes need to be cancelled or altered in some manner the School Director will contact the faculty.  The President will contact the student’s and the closure will be posted on the college website. www.careers-ins.com

Any media contact, press releases, email or website assistance must be coordinated through the School President. 

Step 3 Careers Institute of America – Depending on the evaluation of the situation, one or more of the following may occur:

  • Step 3A – Careers Institute of America will without delay, an taking into account the safety of the community, determine the content of the notification and initiate the notification system, unless the notification, in the professional judgment of responsible authorities, compromise efforts to assist victims or to contain respond, to or otherwise mitigate the emergency.

 

The President goes to scene of the incident to assess the need for back-up personnel.

Based on the initial findings and upon agreement with either the President or Director, the response may include: dealing with the situation alone, contacting appropriate outside agencies (e.g. local police, hospital), contacting family members, contacting counseling center.

  • Step 3B — If warranted, an emergency meeting of the Critical Incident Response Team (CIRT) may be called after evaluation of the situation with the consent of the President and/or Director.  Current contact information for the CIRT is posted around campus in each building at Careers Institute of America and is provided to all Careers Institute of America faculties on a laminated business card. 

 

  • Step 3C – President initiates family contacts.

 

  • Step 3D – CIRT Command Headquarters is activated in the President’s Office.  The Crisis Center (if activated) will be located in the Administration building.  The CIRT Command Head Quarters will communicate directly with the Crisis Center on activities and communications to be carried out.

 

  • Step 3E – Emergency CIRT meeting is called.  If determined in the emergency CIRT meeting, the CIRT will assist the President in dealing with the critical incident.  This may include: assisting affected student or employee’s family members, counseling with students or college employees, gathering additional information, etc.

 

  • Step 4 Careers Institute of America – Once the issue/situation is under control, the CIRT will meet and debrief. Any needed follow-up plans, communications, activities, and/or programs will be determined for final resolution of the critical incident.  Timelines for these activities will be determined and a closure/evaluation meeting of the CIRT will be scheduled. CIRT will evaluate all responses to critical incident at the closure/evaluation meeting.
  • Step 5 Careers Institute of America – The CIRT will recommend to the President any policy revisions in procedures and will compile a Critical Incident Report to be filed in the Office of the President.

Careers Institute of America Crisis Center

When a critical incident involves responses from a variety of personnel, a Crisis Center will be established in the Administration building.  The CIRT Command Headquarters (HQ) will communicate with the Crisis Center to coordinate all activities involved in the responses to the critical incident.  Communications involving responding personnel will be dispersed through this Crisis Center by the Center Head as directed by the CIRT. The President will assign the Center Head of the Crisis Center when a situation arises.  The Center head is responsible for gathering any documents and/or gear necessary.

Member of the Careers Institute of America CRITICAL INCIDENT RESPONSE TEAM

Critical Incident Response Team
President Rakesh Dutta Room #110 Main Office-1 914-527-1453
Director Rita Dutta Room #101 Office-2 972-302-1697
Instructor David Mc Room #117 Office- 5 214-912-4921

Local Community Emergency Services

 

All Emergencies   (Fire, Police, Sheriff, Ambulance) 911
Poison Control Center 1-800-222-1222
Suicide Hotline 1-800-784-2433
Hospitals:                                                                                                    Phone number 
Dallas Medical Center 7 Medical Parkway, Dallas, TX 75234 972-247-1000
Dallas Medical Center Farmer Branch 972-888-7000
Clinics:                                                                                                       Phone numbers 
Dallas Medical Clinic,12879 Josey Lane Ste 100, Dallas, TX 75234 972-247-3600
Cooper Clinic,6350 Lyndon B Johnson Fwy., Dallas, TX 75240 972-661-2061

 

Site Map of Careers Institute of America

 

Emergency Communication Guidelines

In the event of an emergency that directly affects Emergency Communication Guidelines

In the event of an emergency that directly affects Careers Institute of America all students and employees will be notified by telephone, e-mail and the School website

 

EXAMPLES OF LIFE THREATING/SERIOUS 

SITUATIONS AND RESPONSES

 

FIRES:

  • Examples: Buildings, Grounds, Automobiles
  1. Call the appropriate college official at the location.

 

  1. Clearly identify the location of the incident.
    1. Building name
    2. Physical location on campus
    3. Room or area where fire is located

 

  1. Evacuate the area.
    1. Check the evacuation signs posted in hallway and
    2. Follow to the Exit
    3. Gather in Parking lot

 

  1. Call the Fire Department
    1. Remain in Parking lot until the Fire Department has indicated that it is safe to re-enter the building.

 

SEVERE WEATHER:  (i.e., Tornados)

 

  • Tornado Watch – Indicates that conditions are right for a tornado to develop and that the sky and public information system should be monitored.

 

 

  • Tornado Warning – Indicates a tornado has been sighted or is indicated on radar and confirmed by spotters.

 

    • When a tornado WARNING is received by way of siren or public broadcast:
      • Careers Institute of America faculty and staff will insure that all persons with disabilities are evacuated to designated safety areas first, along with other students and visitors.

 

      • If a designated safety area cannot be reached, move away from windows to an inside hall or take cover under desks or tables.
      • Protect yourself by:
        • Lying face down
        • Drawing your knees up under you
        • Covering the back of your head with your hands

 

EMERGENCY EVACUATION SIGNS ARE LOCATED IN THE HALLS OF EACH OF THE BUILDINGS.

POWER OUTAGE:

  • If an electric power outage occurs, the following procedures need to be taken:
    • Emergency flashlights will come on in each room.
    • Open doors and window coverings to take advantage of natural lighting.
    • Help those in need of assistance.
    • Carry flashlight to the Exits.

 

CRIMINAL DISTURBANCE:

  • EXAMPLES:

Robbery

Assault (verbal or physical)

Theft in progress

Hostage situation

Gang activity

Weapon on campus

 

  1. Do not resist or attempt to retaliate unless your life depends on self-defense.
  2. Call local law enforcement.
  3. Report any criminal disturbance to the School President immediately.

 

BOMB THREATS:

  1. Do not hang up or put the person on hold.
  2. Record date and time you were notified of a bomb threat.
  3. Obtain as much information as possible.
  4. Call the School President or Director.
  5. The School President or Director will call the local law enforcement.
  6. Do not take any further action, unless you are specifically asked to do so.

 

DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIOR:

  • Immediately report all cases of criminal mischief, disorderly conduct, or disruptive behavior to the School President or Director.

 

  • Examples of disruptive behavior:

 

    • Throwing rocks in windows
    • Blocking chairs and tables in classrooms
    • Writing on walls and defacing the School property
    • Verbal abuse of students or employees
    • Disturbing instructors or students
    • Unauthorized protests

 

Make written documentation of incident.

DRUG/ALCOHOL INTOXICATION:

  • Immediately call the School President or Director.

 

UNUSUAL BEHAVIOR:

Recognize the ability of the disturbed person to deal rationally with his/her behavior is limited; therefore:

  1. Contact the School President or Director.
  2. Do not argue with the person, no matter how unusual the conversation may seem.
  3. Make no threatening movements or comments to the person.
  4. Designate one student to contact additional staff.
  5. Remain calm during your conversation with the person.
  6. Remain with the person until help arrives, unless you and others feel an immediate threat to your safety.

 

MEDICAL EMERGENCY:

  • Injury to any person or persons requiring treatment by a physician or by registered professional personnel under the standing orders of a physician (i.e., paramedics, ambulance personnel, nurses, etc.)

 

  • Reportable examples include but are not limited to:
    • Medical emergencies
    • Occupational accidents requiring medical treatment other than minor first aid.
    • Accidents caused by property damage or unsafe conditions.
    • Apparent minor injuries that may become major injuries requiring medical treatment by a physician at a later date.

 

  1. First responders may call 911 if they determine that immediate medical attention is necessary.  Once emergency services have been contacted, the School President or Director should be notified of the location of the emergency.

 

  1. ALWAYS document the incident.

 

MINOR FIRST AID:

For the treatment of minor injuries not requiring the services of a physician or registered professional personnel under the standing orders of a physician, a Red Cross First Aid Kit is maintained in the Ladies Restroom with band aids and supplies for minor injuries.

EVACUATION PROCEDURES:

In the situation where a building must be evacuated, evacuation routes are posted in the hallways of the buildings.  For instructors, follow the path indicated unless it endangers you or your students. Be aware of alternate routes to leave your building.  Once outside assemble the group to account for your students. Shut doors behind you as you leave, ensuring all students are out of the room/building.

In the event staff should have to evacuate a facility, they are to close their office doors behind them and exit according to the posted evacuation routes, unless they are blocked or unsafe.

Evacuation routes are posted in the halls of the buildings.  All staff should familiarize themselves with alternate routes from their office to the outside.  In the event of a tornado, staff should move to the interior offices and protect themselves, if possible.

LOCKDOWN PROCEDURES:

The lockdown process will only be initiated with the approval of the School President or Director.

Lockdown is intended to limit access and hazards by controlling and managing staff and students in order to increase safety and reduce possible victimization.

Lockdown Basics:

 

  • REMAIN CALM
  • If safe, check halls and clear them of students and staff.
  • Lock all doors and barricade with furniture if necessary.
  • Lock windows and close blinds.
  • Do not unlock doors or allow anyone in or out until ordered to do so by proper authorities.  Keep cell phone with you if possible. Faculty/Staff will be updated through their cell phones.

 

 

EMERGENCY RESPONSE AND EVACUATION DRILLS

Careers Institute of America conducts a test of the emergency response an evacuation procedures at least once a term.  The test is unannounced to the students and takes place at a time when most of the students, faculty and staff are expected to be present on campus.  An emergency response log is maintained in the President’s Office and includes the date, time and whether the Drill was announced or unannounced. 

all students and employees will be notified by telephone, e-mail and the School website.

EXAMPLES OF LIFE THREATING/SERIOUS 

SITUATIONS AND RESPONSES

 

FIRES:

  • Examples: Buildings, Grounds, Automobiles
  1. Call the appropriate college official at the location.

 

  1. Clearly identify the location of the incident.
    1. Building name
    2. Physical location on campus
    3. Room or area where fire is located

 

  1. Evacuate the area.
    1. Check the evacuation signs posted in hallway and
    2. Follow to the Exit
    3. Gather in Parking lot

 

  1. Call the Fire Department
    1. Remain in Parking lot until the Fire Department has indicated that it is safe to re-enter the building.

 

SEVERE WEATHER:  (i.e., Tornados)

 

  • Tornado Watch – Indicates that conditions are right for a tornado to develop and that the sky and public information system should be monitored.

 

 

  • Tornado Warning – Indicates a tornado has been sighted or is indicated on radar and confirmed by spotters.

 

    • When a tornado WARNING is received by way of siren or public broadcast:
      • Careers Institute of America faculty and staff will insure that all persons with disabilities are evacuated to designated safety areas first, along with other students and visitors.

 

      • If a designated safety area cannot be reached, move away from windows to an inside hall or take cover under desks or tables.
      • Protect yourself by:
        • Lying face down
        • Drawing your knees up under you
        • Covering the back of your head with your hands

 

EMERGENCY EVACUATION SIGNS ARE LOCATED IN THE HALLS OF EACH OF THE BUILDINGS.

 

POWER OUTAGE:

  • If an electric power outage occurs, the following procedures need to be taken:
    • Emergency flashlights will come on in each room.
    • Open doors and window coverings to take advantage of natural lighting.
    • Help those in need of assistance.
    • Carry flashlight to the Exits.

 

CRIMINAL DISTURBANCE:

  • EXAMPLES:

Robbery

Assault (verbal or physical)

Theft in progress

Hostage situation

Gang activity

Weapon on campus

 

  1. Do not resist or attempt to retaliate unless your life depends on self-defense.
  2. Call local law enforcement.
  3. Report any criminal disturbance to the School President immediately.

 

BOMB THREATS:

  1. Do not hang up or put the person on hold.
  2. Record date and time you were notified of a bomb threat.
  3. Obtain as much information as possible.
  4. Call the School President or Director.
  5. The School President or Director will call the local law enforcement.
  6. Do not take any further action, unless you are specifically asked to do so.

 

DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIOR:

  • Immediately report all cases of criminal mischief, disorderly conduct, or disruptive behavior to the School President or Director.

 

  • Examples of disruptive behavior:

 

    • Throwing rocks in windows
    • Blocking chairs and tables in classrooms
    • Writing on walls and defacing the School property
    • Verbal abuse of students or employees
    • Disturbing instructors or students
    • Unauthorized protests

 

Make written documentation of incident.

DRUG/ALCOHOL INTOXICATION:

  • Immediately call the School President or Director.

 

UNUSUAL BEHAVIOR:

Recognize the ability of the disturbed person to deal rationally with his/her behavior is limited; therefore:

  1. Contact the School President or Director.
  2. Do not argue with the person, no matter how unusual the conversation may seem.
  3. Make no threatening movements or comments to the person.
  4. Designate one student to contact additional staff.
  5. Remain calm during your conversation with the person.
  6. Remain with the person until help arrives, unless you and others feel an immediate threat to your safety.

 

MEDICAL EMERGENCY:

  • Injury to any person or persons requiring treatment by a physician or by registered professional personnel under the standing orders of a physician (i.e., paramedics, ambulance personnel, nurses, etc.)

 

  • Reportable examples include but are not limited to:
    • Medical emergencies
    • Occupational accidents requiring medical treatment other than minor first aid.
    • Accidents caused by property damage or unsafe conditions.
    • Apparent minor injuries that may become major injuries requiring medical treatment by a physician at a later date.

 

  1. First responders may call 911 if they determine that immediate medical attention is necessary.  Once emergency services have been contacted, the School President or Director should be notified of the location of the emergency.

 

  1. ALWAYS document the incident.

 

MINOR FIRST AID:

For the treatment of minor injuries not requiring the services of a physician or registered professional personnel under the standing orders of a physician, a Red Cross First Aid Kit is maintained in the Ladies Restroom with band aids and supplies for minor injuries.

EVACUATION PROCEDURES:

In the situation where a building must be evacuated, evacuation routes are posted in the hallways of the buildings.  For instructors, follow the path indicated unless it endangers you or your students. Be aware of alternate routes to leave your building.  Once outside assemble the group to account for your students. Shut doors behind you as you leave, ensuring all students are out of the room/building.

In the event staff should have to evacuate a facility, they are to close their office doors behind them and exit according to the posted evacuation routes, unless they are blocked or unsafe.

Evacuation routes are posted in the halls of the buildings.  All staff should familiarize themselves with alternate routes from their office to the outside.  In the event of a tornado, staff should move to the interior offices and protect themselves, if possible.

 

LOCKDOWN PROCEDURES:

The lockdown process will only be initiated with the approval of the School President or Director.

Lockdown is intended to limit access and hazards by controlling and managing staff and students in order to increase safety and reduce possible victimization.

Lockdown Basics:

 

  • REMAIN CALM
  • If safe, check halls and clear them of students and staff.
  • Lock all doors and barricade with furniture if necessary.
  • Lock windows and close blinds.
  • Do not unlock doors or allow anyone in or out until ordered to do so by proper authorities.  Keep cell phone with you if possible. Faculty/Staff will be updated through their cell phones.

 

 

EMERGENCY RESPONSE AND EVACUATION DRILLS

Careers Institute of America conducts a test of the emergency response an evacuation procedures at least once a term.  The test is unannounced to the students and takes place at a time when most of the students, faculty and staff are expected to be present on campus.  An emergency response log is maintained in the President’s Office and includes the date, time and whether the Drill was announced or unannounced. 

 

CYBER SECURITY POLICY

 

  • INTRODUCTION

 

CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA’s Cyber Security Policy is a formal set of rules by which those staff members who are given access to school technology and information assets must abide.  

 

The Cyber Security Policy serves several purposes. The main purpose is to inform school users: employees, contractors and other authorized users of their obligatory requirements for protecting the technology and information assets of the school.  The Cyber Security Policy describes the technology and information assets that we must protect and identifies many of the threats to those assets.

 

The Cyber Security Policy also describes the user’s responsibilities and privileges. What is considered acceptable use? What are the rules regarding Internet access? The policy answers these questions, describes user limitations and informs users there will be penalties for violation of the policy. This document also contains procedures for responding to incidents that threaten the security of the school’s computer systems and network.

 

  • WHAT ARE WE PROTECTING

 

It is the obligation of all users of the CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA systems to protect the technology and information assets of the school.  This information must be protected from unauthorized access, theft and destruction. The technology and information assets of the CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA are made up of the following components:

 

  • Computer hardware, CPU, disc, Email, web, application servers, PC systems, application software, system software, etc.
  • System Software including: operating systems, database management systems, and backup and restore software, communications protocols, and so forth.
  • Application Software: used by the various departments within the school.  This includes custom written software applications, and commercial off the shelf software packages.
  • Communications Network hardware and software including: routers, routing tables, hubs, modems, multiplexers, switches, firewalls, private lines, and associated network management software and tools.

 

 

  • Classification of Information

 

User information found in computer system files and databases shall be classified as either confidential or non-confidential. The CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA shall classify the information controlled by them. 

 

DEFINITIONS

 

Chief Information Officer.  The Director of the Department of Information Technology (IT) shall serve as the Chief Information Officer.

 

Security Administrator.  An authorized employee shall be designated as the Security Administrator for the school.

 

 

  • THREATS TO SECURITY

 

 

 

  • Employees

 

One of the biggest security threats is employees.  They may do damage to your systems either through incompetence or on purpose.  You must layer your security to compensate for that as well.  You mitigate this by doing the following.

 

Management:

  • Only give out appropriate rights to systems. Limit access to only business hours.  
  • When employees are separated or disciplined, you remove or limit access to systems.
  • Advanced – Keep detailed system logs on all computer activity.

 

Employees:

  • Don’t share accounts to access systems.  Never share your login information with co-workers.
  • Physically secure computer assets, so that only staff with appropriate need can access.

 

 

  • Amateur Hackers and Vandals. 

 

These people are the most common type of attackers on the Internet.  The probability of attack is extremely high and there is also likely to be a large number of attacks. These are usually crimes of opportunity.  These amateur hackers are scanning the Internet and looking for well-known security holes that have not been plugged. Web servers and electronic mail are their favorite targets.  Once they find a weakness they will exploit it to plant viruses, Trojan horses, or use the resources of your system for their own means. If they do not find an obvious weakness they are likely to move on to an easier target. 

 

  • Criminal Hackers and Saboteurs.

 

The probability of this type of attack is low, but not entirely unlikely given the amount of sensitive information contained in databases.  The skill of these attackers is medium to high as they are likely to be trained in the use of the latest hacker tools. The attacks are well planned and are based on any weaknesses discovered that will allow a foothold into the network.

 

  • USER RESPONSIBILITIES

 

This section establishes usage policy for the computer systems, networks and information resources of the office.  It pertains to all employees and contractors who use the computer systems, networks, and information resources as business partners, and individuals who are granted access to the network for the business purposes of the CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA.

 

  • Acceptable Use

 

User accounts on school computer systems are to be used only for business of the school and not to be used for personal activities.  Unauthorized use of the system may be in violation of the law, constitutes theft and can be punishable by law. Therefore, unauthorized use of the school computing system and facilities may constitute grounds for either civil or criminal prosecution.

 

Users are personally responsible for protecting all confidential information used and/or stored on their accounts.  This includes their logon IDs and passwords. Furthermore they are prohibited from making unauthorized copies of such confidential information and/or distributing it to unauthorized persons outside of the school.

 

Users shall not purposely engage in activity with the intent to: harass other users; degrade the performance of the system; divert system resources to their own use; or gain access to CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA systems for which they do not have authorization. 

 

Users shall not attach unauthorized devices on their PCs or workstations, unless they have received specific authorization from the employees’ manager and/or the school IT designee.

Users shall not download unauthorized software from the Internet onto their PCs or workstations.

 

Users are required to report any weaknesses in the school computer security, any incidents of misuse or violation of this policy to their immediate supervisor.

 

  • Use of the Internet

 

The CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA will provide Internet access to employees and contractors who are connected to the internal network and who has a business need for this access.  Employees and contractors must obtain permission from their supervisor and file a request with the Security Administrator.

 

The Internet is a business tool for the CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA.  It is to be used for business-related purposes such as: communicating via electronic mail with suppliers and business partners, obtaining useful business information and relevant technical and business topics.  

 

The Internet service may not be used for transmitting, retrieving or storing any communications of a discriminatory or harassing nature or which are derogatory to any individual or group, obscene or pornographic, or defamatory or threatening in nature for “chain letters” or any other purpose which is illegal or for personal gain.

 

  • Monitoring Use of Computer Systems

 

The CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA has the right and capability to monitor electronic information created and/or communicated by persons using school computer systems and networks, including e-mail messages and usage of the Internet.  It is not the CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA’s policy or intent to continuously monitor all computer usage by employees or other users of the school’s computer systems and network. However, users of the systems should be aware that the CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA may monitor usage, including, but not limited to, patterns of usage of the Internet (e.g. site accessed, on-line length, time of day access), and employees’ electronic files and messages to the extent necessary to ensure that the Internet and other electronic communications are being used in compliance with the law and with CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA policy.

 

  • Access Control

 

A fundamental component of our Cyber Security Policy is controlling access to the critical information resources that require protection from unauthorized disclosure or modification.  The fundamental meaning of access control is that permissions are assigned to individuals or systems that are authorized to access specific resources. Access controls exist at various layers of the system, including the network.  Access control is implemented by logon ID and password. At the application and database level, other access control methods can be implemented to further restrict access. The application and database systems can limit the number of applications and databases available to users based on their job requirements.

 

  • User System and Network Access – Normal User Identification

 

All users will be required to have a unique logon ID and password for access to systems.  The user’s password should be kept confidential and MUST NOT be shared with management & supervisory personnel and/or any other employee whatsoever. All users must comply with the following rules regarding the creation and maintenance of passwords:

 

  • Password must not be found in any English or foreign dictionary.  That is, do not use any common name, noun, verb, adverb, or adjective.  These can be easily cracked using standard “hacker tools”.
  • Passwords should not be posted on or near computer terminals or otherwise be readily accessible in the area of the terminal.

 

Users are not allowed to access password files on any network infrastructure component. Password files on servers will be monitored for access by unauthorized users.  Copying, reading, deleting or modifying a password file on any computer system is prohibited.

 

Users will not be allowed to logon as a System Administrator. Users who need this level of access to production systems must request a Special Access account as outlined elsewhere in this document.

 

Employee Logon IDs and passwords will be deactivated as soon as possible if the employee is terminated, fired, suspended, placed on leave, or otherwise leaves the employment of the CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA.

 

Supervisors / Managers shall immediately and directly contact the school’s IT Manager to report change in employee status that requires terminating or modifying employee logon access privileges.

 

Employees who forget their password must notify the IT department to get a new password assigned to their account.

 

Employees will be responsible for all transactions occurring during Logon sessions initiated by use of the employee’s password and ID.  Employees shall not logon to a computer and then allow another individual to use the computer or otherwise share access to the computer systems.

 

  • System Administrator Access

 

System Administrators, network administrators, and security administrators will have administrative access to host systems, routers, hubs, and firewalls as required to fulfill the duties of their job.

 

All system administrator passwords will be DELETED immediately after any employee who has access to such passwords is terminated, fired, or otherwise leaves the employment of the school.

 

  • Connecting Devices to the Network

 

Only authorized devices may be connected to the CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA network(s).  Authorized devices include PCs and workstations owned by school that comply with the configuration guidelines of the school.  Other authorized devices include network infrastructure devices used for network management and monitoring.

 

Users shall not attach to the network: non-school computers that are not authorized, owned and/or controlled by school.  

 

NOTE: Users are not authorized to attach any device that would alter the topology characteristics of the Network or any unauthorized storage devices, e.g. thumb drives and writable CD’s.

 

  • Remote Access

 

Only authorized persons may remotely access the CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA network. Remote access is provided to those employees, contractors and business partners of the school that have a legitimate business need to exchange information, copy files or programs, or access computer applications.  Authorized connection can be remote PC to the network or a remote network to school network connection. The only acceptable method of remotely connecting into the internal network is using a secure ID.

 

  • Unauthorized Remote Access

 

Users may not install personal software designed to provide remote control of the PC or workstation. This type of remote access bypasses the authorized highly secure methods of remote access and poses a threat to the security of the entire network.

 

  • Penalty for Security Violation

 

The CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA takes the issue of security seriously.  Those people who use the technology and information resources of CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA must be aware that they can be disciplined if they violate this policy.  Upon violation of this policy, an employee of CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA may be subject to discipline up to and including dismissal.  The specific discipline imposed will be determined by a case-by-case basis, taking into consideration the nature and severity of the violation of the Cyber Security Policy, prior violations of the policy committed by the individual, state and federal laws and all other relevant information.  Discipline which may be taken against an employee or student shall be administrated in accordance with any appropriate rules or policies and the CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA Policy Manual.

 

 

  • Security Incident Handling Procedures

 

This section provides some policy guidelines and procedures for handling security incidents.  The term “security incident” is defined as any irregular or adverse event that threatens the security, integrity, or availability of the information resources on any part of the CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA’s network.  Some examples of security incidents are:

  • Illegal access of a school’s computer system.  For example, a hacker logs onto a production server and copies the password file.
  • Damage to a school computer system or network caused by illegal access.  Releasing a virus or worm would be an example.
  • Denial of service attack against a CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA web server.  For example, a hacker initiates a flood of packets against a Web server designed to cause the system to crash.
  • Malicious use of system resources to launch an attack against other computer outside of the CAREERS INSTITUTE OF AMERICA’s network.  For example, the system administrator notices a connection to an unknown network and a strange process accumulating a lot of server time.

Employees, who believe their terminal or computer systems have been subjected to a security incident, or has otherwise been improperly accessed or used, should report the situation to the VP of Administration immediately.  The employee or student shall not turn off the computer or delete suspicious files. Leaving the computer in the condition it was in when the security incident was discovered will assist in identifying the source of the problem and in determining the steps that should be taken to remedy the problem.

 

  1. What is a breach? 

The GLB Act, also known as the Financial Services Modernization Act of 1999 (Public Law # 106-102, 113 Statute 1338), regulates the collection, disclosure, and protection of consumers’ nonpublic personal information or personally identifiable information (PII) by financial institutions.  Section 501 of GLB Act established the following information security standards for financial institutions:

Careers Institute of America shall establish appropriated standard for the institution relating to administrative, technical, and physical safeguards-

  1. To ensure the security and confidentiality of students and employees records and information
  2. To protect against any anticipated threats or hazards to the security or integrity of such records; and
  3. To protect against unauthorized access to or use of such records or information which could result in substantial harm or inconvenience to any student or employee.

 

  1. When Institute have to report a breach:

 

  • The Student Aid Internet Gateway (SAIG) Agreement requires that as a condition of continued participation in the federal student aid programs. 
  • PSIs report actual data breaches, as well as suspected data breaches.
  • Title IV PSIs must report on the day that a data breach is detected or even suspected. 
  • The U.S. Department of Education (the Department) has the authority to fine institutions—up to $54,789 per violation per 34 C.F.R. § 36.2—that do not comply with the requirement to self-report data breaches. 
  • The Department has reminded all institutions of this requirement through Dear Colleague Letters (GEN 15-18, GEN 16-12), electronic announcements, and the annual FSA Handbook.

 

  1. Institute’s breach report Procedures

 

The Program Coordinator shall report a breach, email cpssaig@ed.gov, and copy to the Director and team members who have responsibility for overseeing the Program. The Program Coordinator may delegate or outsource the performance of any function under the Information Security Program as he or she deems necessary from time to time. The School email should include the 

  • Date of the breach (known or suspected) 

 

  • Impact of the breach (number of records, number of students, etc.)

 

  • Method of the breach (hack, accidental disclosure, etc.)

 

  •  Information security program point of contact (email address and phone number are required) 

 

  •  Remediation status (complete, in-process, etc. with detail)

 

  •  Next steps (as needed). 

 

  • If the Program Coordinator cannot email, he/she should call the Department’s security operations center (EDSOC) at 202-245-6550 to report the data listed above. EDSOC operates 24 hours a day, seven days per week. If both previous breach reporting methods fail, Program Coordinator should call or email Tiina Rodrigue at 202-377-3887 or tiina.rodrigue@ed.gov. After the initial report, breach status updates can be emailed directly to Tiina. 

 

Data Security Breach and Self-Report of Data Breach Requirements (PII requirements

Policy

Upon signing a Program Participation Agreement (PPA), Careers Institute of America agreed to comply with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), the U.S. Department of Education’s implementing regulations at 34 C.F. R. Part 99, and the Standards for Safeguarding Customer Information, 16 C.F.R. Part 314, issued by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), as required by the Gramm-Leach-Biley (GLB) Act, P.L. 106-102.  Careers Institute of America is responsible for complying the limitations on the disclosure of PII in students’ education records under FERPA and is subject to Sections 501 and 505(b)(2) of the GLB Act.

What is a breach? 

The GLB Act, also known as the Financial Services Modernization Act of 1999 (Public Law # 106-102, 113 Statute 1338), regulates the collection, disclosure, and protection of consumers’ nonpublic personal information or personally identifiable information (PII) by financial institutions.  Section 501 of GLB Act established the following information security standards for financial institutions:

Careers Institute of America shall establish appropriated standard for the institution relating to administrative, technical, and physical safeguards-

  1. To ensure the security and confidentiality of students and employees records and information
  2. To protect against any anticipated threats or hazards to the security or integrity of such records; and
  3. To protect against unauthorized access to or use of such records or information which could result in substantial harm or inconvenience to any student or employee.

Program Objectives: 

The objectives of this Information Security Program (“Program”) are as follows: 

  • Insure the security and confidentiality of the institution students and employee’s information.  
  • Protect against any anticipated threats or hazards to the security and/or integrity of   the institution’s Student’s and employee’s information.
  • Protect against unauthorized access to or use of the Institution’s students and employee’s information that could result in substantial harm or inconvenience to any customer. 

Purpose

For purposes of Careers Institute of America Security Program, “student information” means any information about a Student’s and/or employee’s, or information the institution receives about the student of another financial institution, that can be directly or indirectly attributed to the student.  This Security Program, in and of itself, does not create a contract between the student and any person or entity.  

 Responsibilities:

Program Coordinator(s) 

This Program and the safeguards it contemplates shall be implemented and maintained by an employee or employees (“Program Coordinator”) designated by the institution’s Director. The Program Coordinator shall design, implement and maintain new safeguards as he or she determines to be necessary from time to time. The Program Coordinator shall report to the Director and team members who have responsibility for overseeing the Program. The Program Coordinator may delegate or outsource the performance of any function under the Information Security Program as he or she deems necessary from time to time.   

In the event the Program Coordinator leaves the employment of the Institution, the Director, shall take over the responsibilities of the Program Coordinator until a new Program Coordinator is designate. 

Procedures

  1. All records containing customer information shall be stored and maintained in a secure area. 
  • Paper records shall be stored in a room, cabinet, or other container that is locked when unattended. The Director and Program Coordinator shall control access to such areas. 
  • All storage areas shall be protected against destruction or potential damage from physical hazards, like fire or floods. 
  • Electronic customer information shall be stored on secure servers. Access to such information shall be password controlled, and the Program Coordinator shall control access to such servers.
  • Student and employee information consisting of financial or other similar information (e.g., social security numbers, etc.) shall not be stored on any computer system with a direct Internet connection.  
  • All customer information shall be backed up on a [daily] basis. Such back up data shall be stored in a secure location as determined by the Program Coordinator.  
  1. All electronic transmissions of student and employee information, whether inbound or outbound, shall be performed on a secure basis.  

 

  • Social Security, IRS information, or other sensitive financial data transmitted to the Institution directly from students shall use a secure connection, such as a Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) or other currently accepted standard, so that the security of such information is protected in transit. Such secure transmissions shall be automatic. Students shall be advised against transmitting sensitive data, like social security, via electronic mail. 
  • The Institution shall require by contract that inbound transmissions of student information delivered to the Institution via other sources be encrypted or otherwise secured. 
  • All outbound transmissions of student information shall be secured in a manner acceptable to the Program Coordinator. 
  • To the extent sensitive data must be transmitted to the Institution by electronic mail, such transmissions shall be password controlled or otherwise protected from theft or unauthorized access at the discretion of the Program Coordinator. 
  • The Program Coordinator and third party service shall review all students’ applications to ensure an appropriate level of security both within the Institution and with the Institution’s business third party server and IRS. 
  1. All paper transmissions of customer information by the Institution shall be performed on a secure basis. 
  • Sensitive student information shall be properly secured at all times.
  • Student information delivered by the Institution to third parties shall be kept sealed at all times. • Paper-based student information shall not be left unattended at any time it is in an unsecured area. 
  1. All student information shall be disposed of in a secure manner. 
  • The Program Coordinator shall supervise the disposal of all records containing student information.
  • Paper based student information shall be shredded and stored in a secure area until a disposal or recycling service picks it up.
  • All hard drives, diskette, magnetic tapes, or any other electronic media containing student information shall be erased and/or destroyed prior to disposing of computers or other hardware. 
  • All hardware shall be effectively destroyed. 
  • All student information shall be disposed of in a secure manner after any applicable retention period. 
  1. The Program Coordinator shall maintain an inventory of Institution computers, including any handheld devices or PDAs, on or through which student information may be stored, accessed or transmitted. 
  2. The Program Coordinator shall develop and maintain appropriate oversight or audit procedures to detect the improper disclosure or theft of student information. 

When Institute have to report a breach: 

 

  • The Student Aid Internet Gateway (SAIG) Agreement requires that as a condition of continued participation in the federal student aid programs. 
  • PSIs report actual data breaches, as well as suspected data breaches.

 

  • Title IV PSIs must report on the day that a data breach is detected or even suspected. 
  • The U.S. Department of Education (the Department) has the authority to fine institutions—up to $54,789 per violation per 34 C.F.R. § 36.2—that do not comply with the requirement to self-report data breaches. 
  • The Department has reminded all institutions of this requirement through Dear Colleague Letters (GEN 15-18, GEN 16-12), electronic announcements, and the annual FSA Handbook.

 

 Information Security Policies and Procedures: 

Detecting, Preventing and Responding to Attacks, Intrusions or Other Systems Failures In keeping with the objectives of the Program, the Institution shall implement, maintain and enforce the following attack and intrusion safeguards: 

 Norton Anti-Virus   (Careers Institute of America)        

ONLINE SMART (Compiled Net Code and anti SQL Injection Technology-Encrypted with SSL encryption on DELL Server)

IBM Backup      (Careers Institute of America)   

ECM-utilizes Educational Compliance Management school interface that is encrypted.  The Careers Institute of America must be secured with a unique logon ID and password for access to systems.              

  1. The Program Coordinator shall ensure the Institution has adequate procedures to address any breaches of the Institution’s information safeguards that would materially impact the confidentiality and security of customer information. The procedures shall address the appropriate response to specific types of breaches, including hackers, general security compromises, denial of access to databases and computer systems, etc.
  2. The Program Coordinator shall utilize and maintain a working knowledge of widely available technology for the protection of student information. 
  3. The Program Coordinator shall communicate with the Institution’s computer vendors from time to time to ensure that the Institution has installed the most recent patches that resolve software vulnerabilities. 
  4. The Institution shall utilize anti-virus software that updates automatically.
  5. The Institution shall maintain up-to-date firewalls. 
  6. The Program Coordinator shall manage the Institution’s information security tools for employees and pass along updates about any security risks or breaches. 
  7. The Program Coordinator shall establish procedures to preserve the security, confidentiality and integrity of student information in the event of a computer or other technological failure.
  8. The Program Coordinator shall ensure that access to student information is granted only to legitimate and valid users. 
  9. The Program Coordinator shall notify students promptly if their student information is subject to loss, damage or unauthorized access. 

Institute’s breach report Procedures

 

The Program Coordinator shall report a breach, email cpssaig@ed.gov, and copy to the Director and team members who have responsibility for overseeing the Program. The Program Coordinator may delegate or outsource the performance of any function under the Information Security Program as he or she deems necessary from time to time. The School email should include the 

  • Date of the breach (known or suspected) 

 

  • Impact of the breach (number of records, number of students, etc.)

 

  • Method of the breach (hack, accidental disclosure, etc.)

 

  • Information security program point of contact (email address and phone number are required)

 

  • Remediation status (complete, in-process, etc. with detail)

 

  • Next steps (as needed). 

 

If the Program Coordinator cannot email, he/she should call the Department’s security operations center (EDSOC) at 202-245-6550 to report the data listed above. EDSOC operates 24 hours a day, seven days per week. If both previous breach reporting methods fail, Program Coordinator should call or email Tiina Rodrigue at 202-377-3887 or tiina.rodrigue@ed.gov. After the initial report, breach status updates can be emailed directly to Tiina. 

 

Data Security Breach and Self-Report of Data Breach Requirements (PII requirements

Policy

Upon signing a Program Participation Agreement (PPA), Careers Institute of America agreed to comply with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), the U.S. Department of Education’s implementing regulations at 34 C.F. R. Part 99, and the Standards for Safeguarding Customer Information, 16 C.F.R. Part 314, issued by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), as required by the Gramm-Leach-Biley (GLB) Act, P.L. 106-102.  Careers Institute of America is responsible for complying the limitations on the disclosure of PII in students’ education records under FERPA and is subject to Sections 501 and 505(b)(2) of the GLB Act.

What is a breach? 

The GLB Act, also known as the Financial Services Modernization Act of 1999 (Public Law # 106-102, 113 Statute 1338), regulates the collection, disclosure, and protection of consumers’ nonpublic personal information or personally identifiable information (PII) by financial institutions.  Section 501 of GLB Act established the following information security standards for financial institutions:

Careers Institute of America shall establish appropriated standard for the institution relating to administrative, technical, and physical safeguards-

  1. To ensure the security and confidentiality of students and employees records and information
  2. To protect against any anticipated threats or hazards to the security or integrity of such records; and
  3. To protect against unauthorized access to or use of such records or information which could result in substantial harm or inconvenience to any student or employee.

Program Objectives: 

The objectives of this Information Security Program (“Program”) are as follows: 

  • Insure the security and confidentiality of the institution students and employee’s information.  
  • Protect against any anticipated threats or hazards to the security and/or integrity of   the institution’s Student’s and employee’s information.
  • Protect against unauthorized access to or use of the Institution’s students and employee’s information that could result in substantial harm or inconvenience to any customer. 

Purpose

For purposes of Careers Institute of America Security Program, “student information” means any information about a Student’s and/or employee’s, or information the institution receives about the student of another financial institution, that can be directly or indirectly attributed to the student.  This Security Program, in and of itself, does not create a contract between the student and any person or entity.  

 Responsibilities:

Program Coordinator(s) 

This Program and the safeguards it contemplates shall be implemented and maintained by an employee or employees (“Program Coordinator”) designated by the institution’s Director. The Program Coordinator shall design, implement and maintain new safeguards as he or she determines to be necessary from time to time. The Program Coordinator shall report to the Director and team members who have responsibility for overseeing the Program. The Program Coordinator may delegate or outsource the performance of any function under the Information Security Program as he or she deems necessary from time to time.   

In the event the Program Coordinator leaves the employment of the Institution, the Director, shall take over the responsibilities of the Program Coordinator until a new Program Coordinator is designate. 

Procedures

  1. All records containing customer information shall be stored and maintained in a secure area.
  • Paper records shall be stored in a room, cabinet, or other container that is locked when unattended. The Director and Program Coordinator shall control access to such areas. 
  • All storage areas shall be protected against destruction or potential damage from physical hazards, like fire or floods. 
  • Electronic customer information shall be stored on secure servers. Access to such information shall be password controlled, and the Program Coordinator shall control access to such servers.
  • Student and employee information consisting of financial or other similar information (e.g., social security numbers, etc.) shall not be stored on any computer system with a direct Internet connection.  
  • All customer information shall be backed up on a [daily] basis. Such back up data shall be stored in a secure location as determined by the Program Coordinator.  
  1. All electronic transmissions of student and employee information, whether inbound or outbound, shall be performed on a secure basis.  
  • Social Security, IRS information, or other sensitive financial data transmitted to the Institution directly from students shall use a secure connection, such as a Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) or other currently accepted standard, so that the security of such information is protected in transit. Such secure transmissions shall be automatic. Students shall be advised against transmitting sensitive data, like social security, via electronic mail. 
  • The Institution shall require by contract that inbound transmissions of student information delivered to the Institution via other sources be encrypted or otherwise secured. 
  • All outbound transmissions of student information shall be secured in a manner acceptable to the Program Coordinator. 
  • To the extent sensitive data must be transmitted to the Institution by electronic mail, such transmissions shall be password controlled or otherwise protected from theft or unauthorized access at the discretion of the Program Coordinator. 
  • The Program Coordinator and third party service shall review all students’ applications to ensure an appropriate level of security both within the Institution and with the Institution’s business third party server and IRS. 
  1. All paper transmissions of customer information by the Institution shall be performed on a secure basis. 
  • Sensitive student information shall be properly secured at all times.
  • Student information delivered by the Institution to third parties shall be kept sealed at all times. • Paper-based student information shall not be left unattended at any time it is in an unsecured area. 
  1. All student information shall be disposed of in a secure manner. 
  • The Program Coordinator shall supervise the disposal of all records containing student information.
  • Paper based student information shall be shredded and stored in a secure area until a disposal or recycling service picks it up.
  • All hard drives, diskette, magnetic tapes, or any other electronic media containing student information shall be erased and/or destroyed prior to disposing of computers or other hardware. 
  • All hardware shall be effectively destroyed. 
  • All student information shall be disposed of in a secure manner after any applicable retention period. 
  1. The Program Coordinator shall maintain an inventory of Institution computers, including any handheld devices or PDAs, on or through which student information may be stored, accessed or transmitted. 
  2. The Program Coordinator shall develop and maintain appropriate oversight or audit procedures to detect the improper disclosure or theft of student information. 

When Institute have to report a breach: 

 

  • The Student Aid Internet Gateway (SAIG) Agreement requires that as a condition of continued participation in the federal student aid programs. 
  • PSIs report actual data breaches, as well as suspected data breaches.
  • Title IV PSIs must report on the day that a data breach is detected or even suspected. 
  • The U.S. Department of Education (the Department) has the authority to fine institutions—up to $54,789 per violation per 34 C.F.R. § 36.2—that do not comply with the requirement to self-report data breaches. 
  • The Department has reminded all institutions of this requirement through Dear Colleague Letters (GEN 15-18, GEN 16-12), electronic announcements, and the annual FSA Handbook.

 

 Information Security Policies and Procedures: 

Detecting, Preventing and Responding to Attacks, Intrusions or Other Systems Failures In keeping with the objectives of the Program, the Institution shall implement, maintain and enforce the following attack and intrusion safeguards: 

 Norton Anti-Virus   (Careers Institute of America)        

ONLINE SMART (Compiled Net Code and anti SQL Injection Technology-Encrypted with SSL encryption on DELL Server)

IBM Backup      (Careers Institute of America)   

ECM-utilizes Educational Compliance Management school interface that is encrypted.  The Careers Institute of America must be secured with a unique logon ID and password for access to systems.                

  1. The Program Coordinator shall ensure the Institution has adequate procedures to address any breaches of the Institution’s information safeguards that would materially impact the confidentiality and security of customer information. The procedures shall address the appropriate response to specific types of breaches, including hackers, general security compromises, denial of access to databases and computer systems, etc.
  2. The Program Coordinator shall utilize and maintain a working knowledge of widely available technology for the protection of student information. 
  3. The Program Coordinator shall communicate with the Institution’s computer vendors from time to time to ensure that the Institution has installed the most recent patches that resolve software vulnerabilities. 
  4. The Institution shall utilize anti-virus software that updates automatically.
  5. The Institution shall maintain up-to-date firewalls. 
  6. The Program Coordinator shall manage the Institution’s information security tools for employees and pass along updates about any security risks or breaches. 
  7. The Program Coordinator shall establish procedures to preserve the security, confidentiality and integrity of student information in the event of a computer or other technological failure.
  8. The Program Coordinator shall ensure that access to student information is granted only to legitimate and valid users. 
  9. The Program Coordinator shall notify students promptly if their student information is subject to loss, damage or unauthorized access. 

Institute’s breach report Procedures

 

The Program Coordinator shall report a breach, email cpssaig@ed.gov, and copy to the Director and team members who have responsibility for overseeing the Program. The Program Coordinator may delegate or outsource the performance of any function under the Information Security Program as he or she deems necessary from time to time. The School email should include the 

  • Date of the breach (known or suspected) 

 

  • Impact of the breach (number of records, number of students, etc.)

 

  • Method of the breach (hack, accidental disclosure, etc.)

 

  • Information security program point of contact (email address and phone number are required) 

 

  • Remediation status (complete, in-process, etc. with detail)

 

  • Next steps (as needed). 

 

If the Program Coordinator cannot email, he/she should call the Department’s security operations center (EDSOC) at 202-245-6550 to report the data listed above. EDSOC operates 24 hours a day, seven days per week. If both previous breach reporting methods fail, Program Coordinator should call or email Tiina Rodrigue at 202-377-3887 or tiina.rodrigue@ed.gov. After the initial report, breach status updates can be emailed directly to Tiina.